Author Topic: Mr. Kochi's Skin Warehouse -47th Regiment Early War Skin Released! Page 25  (Read 86786 times)

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Offline Mr. Kochi

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Re: Mr. Kochi's Skin Warehouse -28th Gloucestershire Skin Released! -Page 5
« Reply #135 on: April 22, 2013, 07:52:25 am »




His Britannic Majesty's 41st Regiment of Foot
-The Canadian Home Guard-




Portraits:

Ranker:


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Ensign:

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Officer:

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Fifer:

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Drummer:

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Download Link: Link 1 Link 2



Special thanks to:

James Grant -3rd Regiment of Foot guards - He provided his glorious all knowing book of British uniforms
Guardsman Masters -29th Foot- Aided me with special details not mentioned in James' book and some historical accuracy issues.
The War of 1812 Mod dev team for including this skin in their mod.


Comments and feedback are appreciated!

Offline Docm30

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By 1812, all British infantry would have been in trousers. Usually blue or dark grey for units serving in Canada, sometimes white.

Offline Mr. Kochi

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Not according to reenactors, though...

Offline Docm30

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Any reenactor that doesn't think the 1810 general order to replace the breeches with trousers obviously hasn't done a great deal of research.

Offline Mr. Kochi

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Well, Idk man. I based my skins on the Fort George 41st Foot reenactors, and they always wear the white pants with black gaiters.

Take a look at these gentlemen: [youtube]heDfn0hokm8?t=4m[/youtube]

Offline Archduke Sven

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Orders to change equipment took some time...

I know this is the British army but to supply the troops in Canada while dealing with armies in the Peninsula too would have been quite straining. Already in the Peninsula soldiers had different colors of pants and that was Britains primary front.


told that bih don't @ me

Offline kpetschulat

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[youtube]heDfn0hokm8?t=4m[/youtube]

That was really cool to watch.

Offline Docm30

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Orders to change equipment took some time...

I know this is the British army but to supply the troops in Canada while dealing with armies in the Peninsula too would have been quite straining. Already in the Peninsula soldiers had different colors of pants and that was Britains primary front.

Most British infantry had already replaced the breeches with white trousers when serving abroad by 1808. The orders to officially replace the breeches with blue-grey trousers would have reached Canada by 1811, so by the start of the war in July, 1812, any remained breeches would have been worn out and replaced---when you only have one pair of leggings they don't last very long at all, certainly not a year. That's why British troops serving more than a year in the Peninsula almost invariably wound up in brown, locally-made trousers (or even coats, in some cases).

I can't see your video presently as all Google pages, including YouTube, are currently down. When you start using reenactors as reference you risk making huge mistakes, though, as some are accurate, whereas others just don't really care. I'd say the majority fall into the latter category.

Offline Mr. Kochi

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Orders to change equipment took some time...

I know this is the British army but to supply the troops in Canada while dealing with armies in the Peninsula too would have been quite straining. Already in the Peninsula soldiers had different colors of pants and that was Britains primary front.

Most British infantry had already replaced the breeches with white trousers when serving abroad by 1808. The orders to officially replace the breeches with blue-grey trousers would have reached Canada by 1811, so by the start of the war in July, 1812, any remained breeches would have been worn out and replaced---when you only have one pair of leggings they don't last very long at all, certainly not a year. That's why British troops serving more than a year in the Peninsula almost invariably wound up in brown, locally-made trousers (or even coats, in some cases).

I can't see your video presently as all Google pages, including YouTube, are currently down. When you start using reenactors as reference you risk making huge mistakes, though, as some are accurate, whereas others just don't really care. I'd say the majority fall into the latter category.

Well, I put the white pants because I've rarely seen 41st wearing the grey ones. Reenactors in Canada, New South Wales and Cardiff always wore the white with black gaiters.

However, and this does strike me as weird, the white pants were issued only on summer time or in hot weather regions. And we're talking about Canada here.

Offline Docm30

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Even the main 41st reenactment group exclusively wear trousers, specifically the white linen ones approved for use abroad in 1807. Which, although somewhat questionably, is not entirely inaccurate, as some regiment reports show that the linen trousers were still being used to some extent during the War of 1812. Most troops were in the blue-grey wool ones, though.

However, and this does strike me as weird, the white pants were issued only on summer time or in hot weather regions. And we're talking about Canada here.

They also issued white tropical shakoes to units in Canada. Horse Guards wasn't known for its greatly logical decisions.

Offline DeoVindice61

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Spoiler
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Downloading and anxiously to play 'em.

Offline Docm30

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I'm all for Canadian pride and what not, but the 41st were Welsh.

Offline Mr. Kochi

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The 41st became the Welch regiment in 1831, but before that, they had no official region attached.

And something tells me that unit was full of Canadian soldiers by the outbreak of the War of 1812.

Offline Docm30

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The 41st didn't recruit in Canada, but rather received regular reinforcements from Britain (primarily Wales, which is why they later received the 'Welch' designation, even if the depot was in Winchester). Most of the men that fought with the 41st in the War of 1812 arrived in the 1809 and 1813 shipments.

Offline Mr. Kochi

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Odd.. How come they didn't recruit Canadians? They don't seem to be bad fellows, and were used to the harsh climate... That, and there were lots of them around...