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Offline The Mighty McLovin

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Brief history on the British Military
« on: July 22, 2015, 11:51:00 pm »
What is this?

This is a directory of the British Army, Navy and other stuff. I made this because I was bored and wanted to learn more about Britain in warfare, both naval and army. In the future I might want to become involved with history and I thought that if I could learn myself, that would affect my grades and I'd be better in the future. I thought that I could start here. I learn most of my things from: http://www.napolun.com/.

Brief Summary of the British Navy
Introduction to the Navy



Great Britain was an island, surrounded by many waters it was safe from most invaders. The British navy made the nation more popular by capturing colonies and making the nation prosper. Sailers had more respect than any land soldier and the navy helped Britain avoid any land wars as possible. The navy increased in size rapidly from 1793 to 1805, going from 500 vessels to 950 vessels in 13 years. In 1808 or 1809.

Ship of the Line



A Ship-of-the-line was a kind of warship. Many of these ships were built between the 1600-1800s. The naval combat of fighting alongside each other in a straight line was used in 1639 (by Dutch Lieutenant-Admiral Maarten Tromp) but officially used in 1653 when it was in the Sailing and Fighting Instructions of 1653 wrote by Robert Blake. Although these ships were highly effective, they had many disadvantages including: big and cumbersome, needed a vast crew and were very expensive. Traditionally these ships were usually built from oak, and after 1801 a lot of British ships were built in India.



The largest Ship-of-the-Lines:

- HMS Caledonia: 120 guns
- HMS Ville de Paris: 110 - 114 guns
- HMS Hibernia: 110 guns
- HMS Victory: 100 - 104 guns


Frigate



A frigate is another kind of warship. The word has been used to describe a warship of different sizes and roles for a few centuries. They are enough to carry quite a large firepower but also small and agile to escape ships-of-the-line. They were used vastly during the American Revolutionary War. They were designed with an unarmed lower deck so that all the guns were above waterline, this enables it to use its guns in heavy weather. They were built of oak, but in some cases were made of pine, but they didn't last that long. Although that they could, they weren't meant to be used against ship-of-the-lines.

Schooner



Schooners were built and intended to be despatch boats. They were first used by the Dutch in the 1500s/1600s. In 1801 the British Navy only had 10 schooners but soon 17 were built in Bermuda and 12 were built in England. The French captured around a dozen during war and one schooner became famous for bringing home news of Trafalgar.

Gunboats



Gunboats carry a single heavy cannon (32 pounder or 48 pounder) and can be used in shallow or restricted areas, where sailing there was dangerous for larger ships. Only 10 gunboats were in service in 1801 with a single carronade or howitzer, and with a displacement of 12 tonnes. A further 85 gunboats were built from 1808 onwards and were used for coastal defense and shallow waters, and for operatons in Denmark, where shallow waters were an advantage.

Admiral Horatio Nelson



Horatio Nelson (1758 - 1805) was famous for his service during the Napoleonic Wars and notably during the Battle of Trafalgar, where he lost his life. He was a famed and esteemed Admiral of the British Navy. In 1777 he was made a Lieutenant and assigned to the West Indies. He saw action on the British side during the American Revolutionary War. In 1779, at the young age of 20, he was made Captain. During 1794, Nelson was shot in the face which cost him half of his right eyebrow and the sight in his right eye. Due to popular belief, many people believe that he wore an eyepatch, which was false, although he did wear an eyeshade to protect his remaining eye. In 1797, due to an unsuccessful conquest on Santa Cruz de Tenerife, Nelson was shot in the right arm and was infected by gangrene, and to avoid dying, he had his arm amputated. He said to his doctor: "Doctor, I want to get rid of this useless piece of flesh here". His surgery was quick and his limb was thrown overboard, despite Nelson wanting to keep it. In 1798, during the Battle of the Nile, Nelson and his fleet defeated the French. The French had a fleet of 13 ships, with 10 of them being sunk or captured. Nelson didn't lose a single ship, and because of this the King made him a Baron. After the Battle of Trafalgar, Nelson became a hero. Nelson hated Napoleon, describing him as an ogre, Satan and a tyrant and hated the French people with a passion, describing them as pests and vermin. The fact that Napoleon rose to power got on Nelson's nerves. Many Englishmen also hated France and the people within it. Nelson captured many American vessels  and hated the Americans and directed a lot of hostility towards them. He said that he hated them all and the rebellious people were trash. Nelson, after defeating the Danish and burning Copenhagen, even sent the Commander of the Danish Naval Academy copies of a short summary of his career and an account of his life. Wellington hated Nelson and found his vanity repellent. Nelson always wanted to reflect his glory and success in his naval career, and always wore his parade uniform, with a collection of his medals and decorations, and a spray of diamonds received from the Sultan of the Ottoman Empire. General John Moore wrote that Nelson looked more like an opera star than a naval commander.
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British Army I: Pre-Napoleonic Wars
Introduction to the Army



There was a big divide between the officers and the rankers. The officers were usually aristocrats but some were sons of people who owned shops or businesses. It was stated that Wellington made his soldiers carry the officers over rivers.

The rankers were usually unemployed, and coming from poverty, and joined the army as an act of desperation, the last step to get some money. The average age was 23 year old and the average height was 5"6.

Statistics



Amount of Regiments (1790s) All of the below regiments had 10 companies

- 30 regiments of cavalry (10 guards, 7 dragoons and 14 light dragoons)
- 88 regiments of infantry (7 guards and 81 line infantry)
- 4 artillery batteries and 1 invalid battalion

TOTAL: 112 regiments



Number of soldiers in places (January 1805)

- 66,000 in England
- 34,000 in Ireland
- 22,500 in East Indies and Ceylon
- 15,300 in West Indies and Jamaica
- 6,500 in Malta
- 4,500 in Gibraltar
- 4,200 in Canada

TOTAL: 153,000 Soldiers



The amount of soldiers in regiments:

- 170,000 line infantry (6,000 foot guards)
- 30,000 cavalry
- 14,000 artillery

TOTAL: 214,000 Soldiers

And according to William Napier, approximately 55,000 of these were stationed in India.



At this point in time, Britain was one of the wealthiest countries in the entire world. And thus, they could affort a lot of rounds per person. These are the statistics:

- British Riflemen (60 rounds/60 blanks per person)
- British Light Infantry (50 rounds/60 blanks per person)
- British Line Infantry (30 rounds per person)

Note how the better marksman had more rounds and blanks.



Training and Punishments



The British army were very strict about training, and training of new soldiers were usually about 6 months. Whereas the French, had 2-3 weeks of training. During marches the discipline in the British army was the strictest. Soldiers were only allowed to be excused from the line if they were ill or needed a break. And they had to get a slip from the Sergeant validating them leaving and give it to their Company Commander.



French deserters who joined the British Army during the Peninsular War deserted once again because the punishments were too severe. Offenders were punished by getting whipped bare backed. In serious cases, they were executed, by either getting hanged or a firing squad. Wellington argued that these punishments were neccesary to maintain the strict rules of the army. Another punishment was "riding the wooden horse", which was a sharp object in which the offender sat on. In some cases they'd attach weights on the offender's foot to add more discomfort. The punishments were also severe in the Russian army as well.



Downsides



The British army was at it's best under the command of Wellington, the army had an amazing regimental system but it was far from successful. With their real only SUCCESSFUL campaign was Spain. Some of the military failures were:

- Flanders (1793 and 1794)
- Holland (1799 and 1809)
- Buenos Aires (two times)
- Dardenelles (1807)
- Egypt (1806)
- Spain and Sweden (1808)
- Naples and Hanover (1805)
- Spain and Italy (1800)

In Holland the army recieved terrible comments from foreign military observers, and appaling comments of the Officers (drunkenness and general bad behaviour). The soldiers drills were out of date and the battalions were of poor quality. Even at Spain, none of Wellington's battles could be called great. In Salamanca he failed to exploit his success and in Fuentes de Onoro and Talavera were near disasters. According to Jac Weller, the Battle of Buscao was a technical defeat but was called a victory. The Battle of Corunna both sides (France and Britain) considered they won, although the Spanish said that the French won. At the Battle of Salamanca, it was one of the only battles were he set out to fight. He failed many of his sieges, and at the Battle of Burgos was a very costly defeat. At the same time, the British army was one of the slowest armies (except the Light Division and Cavalry). French General Thiebault explained that sometimes the French armies were scattered throughout Spain and the British Armies slowness saved them several times.



Desertions

While Wellington had a great army, he could not stop desertions. The following table shows the amount of deserters during the Napoleonic Wars. Also, in each regiment about 10% of people deserted (I think during Peninsular War but I may be wrong).

1805 - 6,479 deserters
1806 - 4,466 deserters
1807 - 5,021 deserters
1808 - 5,059 deserters
1809 - 4,186 deserters
1810 - 3,994 deserters
1811 - 4,060 deserters
1812 - 4,353 deserters
1813 - 5,822 deserters
1814 - 8,857 deserters


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British Army II: During Napoleonic Wars
Introuction to the Army during the Napoleonic Wars



The British army had a huge history. Throughout 350 years, Britain had fought many wars and gained many colonies. Although a lot of this was because of the Navy, the Army also played a massive and significant role. Some say that the best part of the army was the infantry.

The age of British infantrymen during the Napoleonic Wars were between 15-45:

- 50% were between 18-29
- 17% were younger
- 33% were 30 or older

The height of a British infantryman:

- 3% were 5'10 or taller
- 16% were between 5'7 an 5'9
- 60% were between 5'4 and 5'7
- 21% were shorter

Regiments



British line infantry regiments mainly consisted of Englishmen, Scottishmen and Irish men. Infact, there were Irish regiments that contained Scottish, and Scottish that contained Irish. In the 42nd Regiment of Foot "Black Watch" Highlanders they had 84 Englishmen and 201 Irishmen.In the 88th Regiment of Foot "Connaught Raiders" they had 178 Englishmen and 50 Scottishmen. In the 52nd Regiment of Foot "Oxfordshire" Light Infantry they had 90 Scottishmen and 1,031 Irishmen.

Military School



There were two types of warfare being taught in military schools. They were named "The American School" and "The German School".

- The American School taught open formations and light infantry tactics that were useful in North Ameriaca. They liked 2-rank formations and the use of light infantry equipped with rifles.

- The German School taught disciplined and close order drill that were used in the flat areas of Central Europe. This school liked 3-rank formations.

Formations



The British army were built upon 3-rank formations. Although during the Peninsular War, Wellington used 2-rank formations and it turned out to be successful. The Duke of York allowed regiments to pass through using the 2-rank formation regardless of strength. In 1815 at the Battle of Quatres Bras several British regiments were severly chopped down by French lancers, cuirassiers and chasseuers. To prevent this they used a defensive 4-rank formation and this formation was much deeper than an average French line.

Companies and Regimental Placements



Generally, each company consisted of:

- 3 officers (including 1 captain)
- 5 NCOs (2 sergeants and 3 corporals)
- 1 drummer (and sometimes 1 fifer)
- 85-100 privates (in foot guard there is more)

A British field battalion had 10 companies: 1 light company, 1 grenadier company and 8 line infantry companies. The Light/Grenadier companies drummers formed behind their own company:

Statistics:



In March 1806 the strength of the British army was approximately 160,000 men including the KGL. This table shows Wellington's infantry in Autumn 1813 in Spain:

- 1st Division (General Howard) - 3700 men in 4 battalions, 3200 men in 5 KGL battalions
- 2nd Division (General Stewart) - 5800 men in 9 battalions, 2700 men in 5 Portugese battalions
- 3rd Division (General Colville) - 5000 men in 8 battalions, 2500 men in 5 Portugese battalions
- 4th Division (General Cole) - 4000 men in 7 battalions, 2500 men in 5 Portuegese battalions
- 5th Division (General Hay) - 3000 men in 6 battalions, 1500 men in 5 Portugese battalions
- 6th Division (General Clinton) - 4700 men in 7 battalions, 2000 men in 5 Portugese battalions
- 7th Division (General Le Cor) - 3500 men in 7 battalions, 2500 men in 5 Portugese battalions
- Light Division (General von Alten) 3300 men in 5 battalions, 1600 men in 4 Portugese battalions
- Division (General Hamilton) - 5000 men in 9 Portugese battalions

British Grenadiers



The British Grenadiers were normally seen with red wings with white fringdes, white-plumed shakos and officers wore chain or laced wings. This company, along with the Light Company, were usually referred to as the flanking companie, not a lot of flanking companies were formed in 1811 in the Barrosa Campaign. The Light/Grenadier companies were known as elite companies. In August 1812, the grenadiers of the 1st Foot Guards stormed an captured a Bridge in Seville. It was rare for the British to detach and form entire battalions of Grenadiers. It's known in 1793 detached from their parent battalions and formed 3 grenadier battalions.

Redcoats



The term 'Redcoat' is oftenly referred to a British infantryman. They were first used in 1645, in the New Model army under command of Oliver Cromwell. In America, the term is associated with the British soldiers that fought against the American colonists. Some nicknames for them were "regulars" an "the King's men". Some abusive nicknames included "bloody backs" because of their red uniforms and the whipping of their soldiers for military offenses, and "lobsters" or "lobsterbacks". Britain are the only nation to keep the red coats, and it's brilliancy used to strike terror into the enemy. The Danish and Hanoverian soldiers used to wear the red coat, but dropped it very shortly. While the rifle regiments and KGL were allowed to adopt the green clothing and black leather equipment the light infantry were forced to use the red uniforms. For rankers, the cloth was dull red but for officers it was scarlet red. Officers jackets were double-breasted, well tailored and often padded to exaggerate the outline.

Regimental Lacings and Plumes



The following a list of the regimental lacings:

White - 17th, 32nd, 43rd, 47th, 59th, 65th, 74th,
Pale Yellow - 9th, 10th, 12th, 20th, 26th, 30th, 46th, 57th, 67th, 82nd, 83rd, 84th, 91st,
Yellow - 13th, 15th, 16th, 28th, 29th, 34th, 37th, 38th, 44th, 75th, 77th, 80th, 85th, 86th, 88th, 93rd,
Deep Yellow - 6th, 25th, 72nd,
Yellow Green - 5th, 36th, 54th, 66th,
Light Green - 39th,
Blue Green - 11th, 19th, 24th, 45th, 49th, 51st, 55th, 63rd, 68th, 69th, 73rd, 79th, 87th, 94th
Pale Buff - 27th,
Buff - 3rd, 14th, 22nd, 31st, 48th, 52nd, 61st, 62nd, 71st, 78th, 81st, 96th
Deep Buff - 40th, 90th,
Orange - 35th,
Red - 33rd, 41st, 53rd, 76th,
Purple - 56th,
Blue - 1st, 2nd, 3rd Foot Guards, 1st, 2nd, 4th, 7th, 8th, 18th, 21st, 23rd, 42nd, 60th,
Black - 50th, 58th, 64th, 70th, 89th

Plumes of line infantry:

white for grenadier company
green for light company
red over white for center companies
(only in 42nd the center companies had red plumes,
light company had red over green plume
grenadier company had red over white plume)

Plumes of light infantry (& rifles):

green for grenadier company
green for light company
green for center companies

Uniforms



Trousers

In parade time during peacetime British soldiers wore white breaches with black gaiters. During campaign, they whore white during summer and grey-blue during winter. At Waterloo, however, they all wore grey trousers.

Kilts

With the exception of the 71st-75th regiments, all Highlander regiments wore kilts. But at Waterloo, apart from the 42nd, 79th and 92nd all of the regiments didn't wear kilts.

Shakos

In 1806 the heavy and uncomfortable leather shako was replaced by the felt shako. In a 1811 report it said that the shako was unsuitable and was easily damaged, so a new shako was designed and approved in 1812. It was called the Belgic shako, and was almost identical to the Portugese shako. This shako (also known as the "Waterloo Shako) was allowed to be used in December 1811. It was made of black felt, 8.5 inches hih in the front and 6 inches at the back. A red and white plume was worn on the left side, emering from behind a black cloth rosette.

The shako cords were, as of 1815 were:

- gold crimson for the officers
- white for the NCO's, grenadiers and fusiliers
- green for light infantry

Privates of the 42nd Black Watch wore the hummel bonnet. It was made of blue clotoh and black ostrich feathers on the left side, which were rooped over to the right side, making it look like an all-feather bonnet. The heaband had 3 bands of (red, white and green) diced cloth. On the left side there was a black cockade with a regimental pattern button into which was attached white-over-red plume. The chinstraps were made of black leather.

Foot Guards



Most monarchies have at least one regiment of Foot Guards, which were used to protect them. Many nations have guard regiments in their armies, and the word "guard" is an honorable rank to differentiate them from the normal soldiers. Guards were recruited from the biggest and the best volunteers, and were usually war veterans. The guard were known for high discipline and were uniformed like normal line infantry but with regimental differences. There were 3 regiments of Foot Guards in the British Army. These are the 3 foot guard regiments:

- The 1st Regiment was the first foot guard regiment to be created and is the most senior Line Infantry regiment in the whole army, and the most senior Foot Guard regiment in the whole army. As a result of them driving off the French Grenadiers at the Battle of Waterloo they were re-named Grenadier Regiment of Foot Guards, and are the only regiment to be named after their actions during battle.

- The 2nd Regiment is also known as the Coldstream Guards, and are the oldest regiment in the whole army. They can be traced back to the New Model army, and were formed on the Scottish Border in 1650. They were known for their active service during the Napoleonic Wars (Egypt, CopenHagen, Portugal, Walcheren Expedition, Waterloo) and was a part of the allied occupation forces of Paris until 1816.

- The 3rd Regiment of Footguards, also known as the Scots Guards, can be traced back to 1642 and was raised by Archibald 1st Marquess of Argyll.

Light Infantry



The British well trained light infantry were mocked by American farmers, militia and Indians fighting in loose formations and irregular combat. The Light Infantry (except the 60th and 95th Regiment) were classed under the French light infantry. Described by French General Foy they have nothing light about them but the name and that they wore regular infantry uniforms but with small enhancements. He also stated that the British light infantry lacke sufficient intelligence to be a real sharpshooter, but you could aruge that he's been biased. Three elite units (60th, 95th and KGL) were all armed with rifles. Marshal Soult spoke honourably about the light infantry, saying that the Light Infantry were killing the French officers very fast, in proportion with the French rankers. However, a Royal Scots officer wrote that after Waterloo the French skirmishers were generally better trained, and much more effective in this type of warfare. The 43rd and 52nd Light Infantry regiments recieveed special training from Sir John Moore and formed the famous Light Division in Wellington's army, in Spain and Portugal. There was the 71st Highland Light Infantry Regiment and the 2 rifle units, the 60th and the 95th. In some cases the Light Infantry were transported on horseback (the Russians did it with their jagers during 1812 and 1813).

Rifles



The rifle was a more accurate weapon than the smoothbore muskets. In 1797, a gun was used by the 60th. It was designed primarily for hunting, and was accurate, but had a slow reloading speed and needed to be re-loaded every few shots. A london gunsmith named Ezekial Baker, designed a new rifle which was aimed and military purposes rather than hunting requirements. This rifle had similar accuracy as the previous rifle and reduced the amount of fouling massively, allowing more shots between reloading. Because of this nature, the rifle was more sooted to sharpshooters than regular line infantry, and was given to them instead. A well-trained rifleman could fire 1 round per minute, approximately. This was called the Baker Rifle. At Waterloo, 4000 men were armed with Baker rifles.

Weaknesses of rifles:

- Long reloaded time
- Needed good cleaning
- They become easily fouled


Riflemen used a thing called a long bayonet, also known as "sword bayonet" desinged to make the rifle the same size as a musket equipped with a regular bayonet. It wasn't great in hand-to-hand combat though.

95th Rifles "The Grasshoppers"



The 95th Rifles earned the nickname "The Grasshoppers" because of their green uniforms and fast agility. Apart of Wellington's Light Division, they were the eyes and ears for Wellington. They were usually spread out, had no colours, and reacted to wistle/bugle calls instead of drumming. The 95th Regiment of Foot was formed due to the American Militia fighting in the American Revolutionary War. After a long time of extensive training, many men were extracted from line infantry regiments and first saw action in August 1800. During the Peninsular Campaign, the 95th Rifles participated in numerous skirmishes an light infantry combats. They became famous because of many battles, including Salamanca. In the Battle of Quatres Bras, the 95th Rifles were sent to re-take the village from General Bachelu. They failed and the Prince of Orange sent the 27th Dutch Jagers were sent with the 95th but they also failed.

Highlanders and Lowlanders



During history, the English and Scottish were very unfriendly wich each other. Dating back to the 1600s, Oliver Cromwell even sold them into history. They were sold in auctions, with only 3s being spent on their food weekly. They were driven from their homes (often by bayonet, truncheon and fire) and were used in mass sheep farming for the English. In Scotland, there was a big divide between Lowlanders and Highlanders. Lowlanders often spoke English and were a mixture of all races that had invaded England many years before. The Lowlanders had a society based on money. The Highlanders however, came from Celtic and Viking origins and other faces. They spoke Gaelic and a society based on loyalty and power. The Lowlanders wore the uniform of English line infantry, while the Highlanders wore kilts (apart from 71st-75th Regiments). One of the most famous, and popoular Highlander regiments was the 42nd Regiment of Foot, and were known as the "Black Watch". The first companies were raised as militia in 1725. The nickname comes from the dark tartans they wear.

List of Scottish regiments during the Napoleonic wars (1808):

3rd Foot Guards 'Scots Guards' (Lowlanders)
 - 1st Foot 'Royal Scots' (Lowlanders)
 - 21st Foot (Lowlanders)
 - 25th Foot (Lowlanders)
 - 26th Foot (Lowlanders)
 - 42nd Royal Highlanders 'Black Watch'
 - 70th Foot (Lowlanders)
 - 71st Highlanders/light infantry
 - 72nd Highlanders
 - 73rd Highlanders
 - 74th Highlanders
 - 75th Highlanders
 - 76th Highlanders
 - 77th Highlanders
 - 78th Highlanders
 - 79th Cameron Highlanders
 - 84th Highlanders
 - 89th Gordon Highlanders
 - 90th Highlanders
 - 91st Highlanders
 - 92nd Gordon Highlanders
 - 93rd Highlanders
 - 94th Highlanders


Irishmen



The British Army had alaways used Irishmen. One of the most famous and "most Irish" regiments were the 88th Regiment of Foot 'Connaught Raiders'. The were well known for plundering and hard fighting, and Wellington described them as "the most astonishing infantry". General Picton gave them the infamous nickname of "The Devil's Own". These are the Irish regiments during the Napoleonic Wars:

18th Foot 'Royal Irish'
 - 27th Foot 'Inniskilling'
 - 83rd Foot
 - 86th Foot
 - 87th Foot
 - 88th Foot 'Connaught Rangers'
 - 89th Foot
 - 99th Foot
 - 100th Foot
 - 101st Foot
 - 103rd Foot
[close]

I appreciate feedback on where I can improve or where I went wrong.  :P
« Last Edit: July 23, 2015, 10:32:14 am by RedcoatOfEngland »

Offline TheRedRedcoat

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Re: Brief history on the British Military
« Reply #1 on: August 23, 2015, 08:19:47 pm »
Sexy

Offline Saxon

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Re: Brief history on the British Military
« Reply #2 on: August 23, 2015, 08:36:33 pm »
If you ever do anything modern, drop me a PM and I'll give you a hand.

Offline The Mighty McLovin

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Re: Brief history on the British Military
« Reply #3 on: August 23, 2015, 08:37:35 pm »
Sexy

This was made when I was memer 0.5. Now im memer 1.0.

Offline The Mighty McLovin

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Re: Brief history on the British Military
« Reply #4 on: August 23, 2015, 08:37:57 pm »
If you ever do anything modern, drop me a PM and I'll give you a hand.

Thank you.

Offline Connzcdf

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Re: Brief history on the British Military
« Reply #5 on: August 23, 2015, 08:40:01 pm »
Not to be an ass or anything, but you made a thread where you practically copy and paste information from other sites all based on the British army? Sound.

Offline The Mighty McLovin

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Re: Brief history on the British Military
« Reply #6 on: August 23, 2015, 08:42:00 pm »
Not to be an ass or anything, but you made a thread where you practically copy and paste information from other sites all based on the British army? Sound.

This thread was buried because it was autistic, but someone bumped it. Also, did you come alive from 1 year ago just to post this?

Offline Connzcdf

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Re: Brief history on the British Military
« Reply #7 on: August 23, 2015, 08:42:28 pm »
Not to be an ass or anything, but you made a thread where you practically copy and paste information from other sites all based on the British army? Sound.

This thread was buried because it was autistic, but someone bumped it. Also, did you come alive from 1 year ago just to post this?
Yes.

Offline Ted

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Re: Brief history on the British Military
« Reply #8 on: August 23, 2015, 10:41:18 pm »
Not to be an ass or anything, but you made a thread where you practically copy and paste information from other sites all based on the British army? Sound.
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Offline The Mighty McLovin

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Re: Brief history on the British Military
« Reply #9 on: August 23, 2015, 10:43:43 pm »
This thread was buried because it was autistic, but someone bumped it.

Offline Murphy

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Re: Brief history on the British Military
« Reply #10 on: August 23, 2015, 11:53:25 pm »
Not to be an ass or anything, but you made a thread where you practically copy and paste information from other sites all based on the British army? Sound.

This thread was buried because it was autistic, but someone bumped it. Also, did you come alive from 1 year ago just to post this?
Yes.


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