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Topics - Jorvasker

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31
Community / Favorite Tavington Quotes?
« on: October 14, 2013, 02:26:18 am »
Hello! The is a thread for everyone to post their favorite quotes that Tav has said to you or to one of your friends or just heard him say to random people.

My favorites include:

"You filthy colonial, are a useless waste of human existence."

"You are a mentally inept donkey."

"I'll ban you from Groupfighting."

"Shush Colonial, shower yourself in some freedom and liberty, that should make you feel better."

32
Clans / VI Victrix [Rome at War Legion] [EU/NA]
« on: September 11, 2013, 04:54:48 am »


This Legion fights for the
Primo Polybian Exercitus


The Legio VI Victrix is a Rome at War Legion that is driven to give its players a Fun, Disciplined, and Historical experience in Rome at War. We heavily focus on the historical nature of how Roman legions were once used and implement it that best way possible into Rome at War mod. One of our main goals is to have a structured unit in which players from around the world can come and enjoy this great mod, we only do events on the weekends so that everyone has the same chances of attending and having a great time. In order to keep things historical we do use double rank drill, because Romans often were in multiple ranks and not just one, we also provide disciplined unit, of course this won't take away the fun but we don't like our members acting like morons while learning and fighting under our banner. If you think you have what it takes to be a true soldier of Rome and fight for her glory then sign up for the Legio VI Victrix!



In 119, Hadrian relocated the legion to northern Britannia, to assist the already present legions in quelling the resistance there. Victrix was key in securing victory, and would eventually replace the diminished IX Hispana at Eboracum. In 122 the legion started work on Hadrian's Wall which would sustain the peace for two decades.
Twenty years later, they helped construct the Antonine Wall, but it was largely abandoned by 164.
In 185, the British legions mutinied and put forward a commander of their own, named Priscus, to replace the unpopular Emperor Commodus, but the former declined. The mutiny was suppressed by Pertinax, who would later become emperor himself after Commodus was murdered.
In 175 The Roman emperor, Marcus Aurelius, defeats the Iazyges tribe of Alans otherwise known as Sarmatians. He takes them into Roman service and settles them in Northern Britain, at Ribchester, south of Lancaster. The Alans Cataphracts are assigned to the VI Legion Victrix, commanded by the Alani warlord who is renamed Lucius Artorius Castus.
The legion is mentioned in Robert Heinlein's novel Have Space Suit - Will Travel. and in the book From Scythia to Camelot By C. Scott Littleton and Linda A. Malcor
A modern reenactment group based in Los Angeles reenacts this legion.







Enlisted Men
Immunis
Munifex             
Tirones
Centurionate
Centurio
Optio
Tesserarius
Decanus
Imperium
Legatus
Tribunus
Praefectus




Officers/NCO's

Consvl~ Consvl
Consvl Jorvasker

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -


Legatus ~ Legatus
Legatus Varaxi

Praefectus ~ Praefectus


Tribunes ~ Tribrunes


Centurions ~ Centurio
Centurio Gunnius

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Optio ~ Optio


Tessarius ~ Tessarius

Decanus ~ Decanus
Decanus Ifriticus
Decanus Aktuh


               
Enlisted

Aquilifer ~ Aquil
Aquilifer Quintus_Sextus


Immunis ~ Immunis
Immunis Walko

Munifex ~ Muni
Munifex Mathias
Munifex Madbull
Munifex Mead-Cakes
Munifex Icewoofe
Munifex Romulus
Munifex Battleboss
Munifex Bjorn_the_Hardened
Munifex Snookius
Munifex Apollo
Munifex OdinsWolf


Tiro ~ Tiro
Tirones Septimus
Tirones GoldenPrototype
Tirones Sextus
Tirones Horius
Tirones Sharkius
Tirones Lysander
Tirones Odd
Tirones Apicius
Tirones Publius Maximus
Tirones Lexan
Tirones Marius
Tirones Tillius
Tirones A_Happy_Cactus
Tirones Syanide
Tirones Spatulot
Tirones DarksydeRob
Tirones Lycurgos
Tirones Drew
Tirones Simon
Tirones Geno
Tirones Caesuras
Tirones Snake
Tirones Tobitus
Tirones Russo
Tirones Shermanator-87
Tirones TheHorica666
Tirones Dusty926
Tirones Rybu
Tirones Arminius
Tirones Spartan
Tirones Mufasamus
Tirones Tigerscar
Tirones Noodlenrice
Tirones Strategist
Tirones Titus Pullo
Tirones Hochi
Tirones Lunar
Tirones MrFail
Tirones Perseus
Tirones Runic


Active Strength ~ 51
Total Strength ~ 60



In order to join the Legio VI Victrix you must fill out an application as a reply to this thread I or one of my officers will accept it no longer than 24 hours

Code
Steam ID:
Request Name in Legion:
Why do you want to join the legion?
Age:
Are you good at melee combat?:
What Country Are You From?

Tirone Information
Spoiler
In-game Tags- VI_Victrix_Tiro_Name
In-game Banner-  First page, botton row, It has "VI Victrix" on it
Teamspeak: dfw01.mainvoice.net:7014
Schedule: Friday Training 5pm EST/2pm PST/10pm GMT
Saturday Shield Battle 1pm EST/10am PST/6pm GMT
[close]

33
Media / 1st East Prussian Infantry Linebattle Videos
« on: August 11, 2013, 01:57:31 am »

Hello! So I though it would be a good Idea to start recording and posting updated videos of the 1stEPI since most of the ones currently on youtube are old. So here is where you can find all the latest Video of the 1st East Prussian Infantry!

Also...If you do wish to join after watching some of these just follow the steps:
1. Go to our website Here and register
2. Go to the "Application" sections of our forums and copy and paste the template as a reply to the thread.
3. Wait for your answer.


Linebattle #1



Linebattle #2

34
Regiments / 61st (South Gloucestershire) Regiment of Foot [NA]
« on: July 01, 2013, 02:35:38 am »
Work in Progress





With the outbreak of the Seven Years War, a decision was made to increase the size of the British Army. During the winter of 1756/57 a number of existing formed second battalions. The 3rd Regiment of Foot formed a second battalion on 10 December 1756. In September 1757 both battalions of the 3rd Foot took part in an assault of the French coast. They returned to England in October, and on 21 April 1758 the 2nd Battalion became the 61st Regiment of Foot, with Major General Granville Elliott as colonel. The new regiment retained the buff facings of the 3rd Foot.

In late 1758 the 61st Foot embarked for the West Indies. On 16 January 1759 they took part in the attempted Invasion of Martinique, but were forced to withdraw after three days. On 24 January they landed on Guadeloupe. Following more than three months of heavy fighting, the French forces surrendered on 1 May. The regiment returned to England in the summer of 1760 where they engaged in recruiting to make up for the casualties suffered in the West Indies.

After a period of garrison service in England, Ireland and the Channel Islands the 61st Foot was stationed on the island of Minorca in 1771. The island had become a British possession under the Treaty of Paris of 1763. By 1779 Britain was involved in a war with America, France and Spain, and in August 1781 a Franco-Spanish force began an attack. The 61st found themselves besieged in Fort St Philip. By February 1782 the garrison's numbers had been greatly reduced by dysentery and they surrendered. The remains of the regiment were repatriated in May 1782 where they began recruiting. In August 1782 all regiments of foot without a royal title were given a county designation, and the regiment became the 61st (South Gloucestershire) Regiment of Foot in 1782. In 1783 the regiment moved to Ireland where it remained until 1792. In the latter year they moved to Gibraltar.

***

In 1793 the French Revolutionary government declared war on Great Britain. The 61st were once again dispatched to the Caribbean, landing in Martinique in December 1794. In April 1795 they moved to St Lucia as part of the force under Brigadier-General James Stewart. Forced to return to Martinique three months later, in the following year they returned to St Lucia as part of a successful invasion. The regiment had suffered very heavy casualties and returned to England in October 1796 to be made up to strength. They moved to Guernsey in 1797, and to the Cape of Good Hope in 1799.
In 1801 the regiment proceeded to Egypt where they took part in the campaign to expel the French Armée d'Orient from the country. In 1802 the regiment was awarded the badge of a sphinx superscribed "Egypt" for display on the regimental colours in commemoration of the campaign.
In 1803 the regiment moved to Malta, and in July of the same year the existing regiment was redesignated as 1st Battalion, 61st (South Gloucestershire) Regiment of Foot when a second battalion was raised in County Durham and Northumberland. The 2nd Battalion was raised as part of the expansion of the army in response to the threat of invasion by France, and spent its entire existence in England and Ireland, before being disbanded in October 1814.
In November the First Battalion (or 1/61st) landed in Italy. Early in the following year they were forced to evacuate to Sicily, along with the deposed King Ferdinand IV. The flank companies 1/61st returned to the Italian mainland in June 1806 as part of the force commanded by Major-General John Stuart, and took part in the Battle of Maida on 4 July. The battalion returned to Sicily soon after. In 1807 they moved to Gibraltar.
In June 1809 the 1/61st landed in Lisbon, Portugal and joined the army fighting under Sir Arthur Wellesley in Spain. They took part in the Battle of Talavera on 27-28 July. The 1st Battalion, which had seen heavy casulaties, received a draft of 300 men from the 2nd Battalion in February 1810, bringing up to full strength. They saw action in a number of minor engagements taking part in the Battle of Salamanca (22 July 1812) and the Siege of Burgos (September - October 1812), the Battle of the Pyrenees (July - August 1813). They pursued the retreating French forces into France, fighting at the Battle of Nivelle (November 1813), Battle of the Nive (December 1813), Battle of Orthez (February 1814) and the Battle of Toulouse in April 1814. The battalion's commanding officer, Lieutenant-Colonel Robert John Coghlan was killed at Toulouse. Within a few days French forces had capitulated and the 1/61st was moved to Bordeaux.
The 1st Battalion landed in Cork, Ireland in July 1814, proceeding to Dundalk where it absorbed the abolished 2nd Battalion in October.


The 61st Foot spent more than thirty years on garrison duty before seeing active service again. From 1816-22 they were stationed in Jamaica, from 1822-28 in England and from 1828-40 in Ceylon. They were stationed in England and Ireland from 1840-45.[2] In 1845 they moved to India, fighting in the Second Anglo-Sikh War of 1848-49: at the Battle of Ramnagar (November 1848), Battles of Saddalupar and Chillianwala (December 1848- January 1849) and Battle of Gujrat (February 1849). The regiment was still in India when Indian Rebellion of 1857 broke out. They took part in the Siege of Delhi.

***

The remaining years of the 61st's existence as a separate regiment were uneventful. From India they moved to Mauritius in 1859 for a year before returning to England. Following garrison duty in the Channel Islands and Ireland, they moved to Bermuda in 1866 and Canada in 1870. In 1872 they moved to Ireland. In 1873, under the Cardwell Reforms, the United Kingdom was divided into 66 "Brigade Districts" which generally corresponded to one or more counties. A depot was to be established, which would the home for two regular infantry battalions. At any one time one of the regular battalions was to be on "home" service and the other on "foreign" duty, with the roles being rotated from time to time. The county militia regiments were also to share the depots. The 61st Foot were linked with the 28th (North Gloucestershire) Regiment of Foot, with a depot at Bristol. The 61st subsequently moved to the Channel Islands in 1875, England in 1876 and Malta in 1878. In 1880 they returned to India.
On 1 July 1881 the reforms of 1874 were carried to their logical conclusion when the 28th and 61st Regiments along with the militia regiments of Gloucestershire were amalgamated to form the Gloucestershire Regiment. The 61st Foot became 2nd Battalion, The Gloucestershire Regiment. Following two further amalgamations, the regiment's lineage is continued today by The Rifles.





In-game Flag:

In-game tags: 61st_Rec_Name
(In the 61st we highly encourage all of our member to use historical English names)

Teamspeak IP: TBDDownload Here






Add an officer on steam








2. Fill out this Application and post it on this page
Code
1. Age?
2. Where are you from?
3. In-game Name?
4. Desired Historical Name? (There is a list on our TS to help you)
5. How did you hear about us?
6. On a scale of 1-10 what do you think your melee abilities are?
7. Can you attend 75% of the events listed above?
8. Why do you want to join the 61st?
9. Do you agree to behave and follow our Code of Conduct?[/center]





Officers
Colonel   Col
Lieutenant Colonel   LtCol
Major   Maj
Captain   Cpt
Lieutenant   Lt
Ensign   Ens
NCOs
Serjeant Major   SjtMaj
Colour Serjeant   CSjt
Serjeant   Sjt
Corporal   Cpl
Enlisted
Lance Corporal   LCpl
Private   Pte
Recruit   Rec

35
79th Regiment of Foot "Queen's Own" Cameron Highlanders






About


The regiment was raised as the 79th Regiment of Foot (Cameronian Volunteers) on August 17, 1793 at Fort William from among the members of the Clan Cameron by Sir Allan Cameron of Erracht. Originally on the Irish establishment, it became part of the British Army in 1804, and in 1806 it was renamed as the 79th Regiment of Foot (Cameron Highlanders). Upon being raised, it was decided that the red-based Cameron tartan would not be used, and instead a new design was devised. The Cameron of Erracht tartan was based on the Macdonald sett with the addition of a yellow line from the Cameron tartan, and the omission of three red lines found in that of Macdonald.

The regiment was formed at the height of the French Revolutionary Wars, and moved to the Netherlands in 1794 where it took part in an unsuccessful campaign, before being evacuated back to Great Britain. On its return the 79th Foot was listed for disbandment, with the men being drafted into other units. In the end the regiment was reprieved, being instead posted to the West Indies in 1795. After a two-year tour the 79th were on garrison duties in England and Guernsey until 1799.

In 1799 the regiment was again in action against the French in Holland, as part of the Helder Campaign. On October 2, 1799 it took part in its first major battle at Egmont-op-Zee. At the end of the campaign the 79th returned to England. In 1800 the 79th was part of a force that took part in a failed assault on the Spanish coast at Ferrol. In March 1801 the 79th Foot landed at Aboukir Bay, Egypt as part of an expeditionary force to prevent French control of the land route to India. After victories at Mandora and Alexandria, the British forces forced the surrender of the French forces at Cairo. Along with other regiments that took part in the Egyptian campaign the 79th Foot were henceforth permitted to bear a sphinx superscribed EGYPT on its colours and badges.

The 79th spent the next few years in Minorca and the United Kingdom without coming under fire. A second battalion was formed in 1804, as a draft-finding unit. The 1st Battalion took part in an engagement at Copenhagen, Denmark in 1807, before returning to England. In 1808 the 79th Foot moved to Portugal, moving to Spain in the following year and participating in several major battles of the Peninsular War, listed below.

-Corunna in 1809,
-Busaco and the defence of Cadiz in 1810,
-Fuentes d'Onor in 1811,
-The Battle of Salamanca, the occupation of Madrid and the siege of Burgos in 1812,
-the Battles of the Pyrenees, Nivelle, Nive in 1813
-The Battle of Toulouse in 1814


Following the abdication of Napoleon in 1814, the regiment moved to Cork, Ireland. However, with the return of Napoleon from exile, the 79th Foot travelled to Belgium in May, 1815. The regiment took part in the final battles of the Napoleonic Wars at Quatre Bras and Waterloo in June.




Officers and Non-commissioned Officers
Regimental officers and NCOs are what hold the regimental discipline together. They enforce our code of conduct within the regiment and most importantly lead our members valiantly into battle. To become one of these men, you must be a highly disciplined member. Dedication and activity will get you here. Coming to linebattles, assisting with recruitment and training our ideal traits in officers and NCOs.

Officers
  • Colonel - Overall regiment leader and diplomat; makes final decisions on regiment issues and leads the regiment on the field.
  • Lt. Colonel - Second in command of the regiment, assists the Colonel.
  • Major - Battalion commander.
  • Captain - Company commander.
  • Lieutenant - Company officer, assists the Captain.
  • Ensign - Officer in training.

NCOs
  • Serjeant Major - In charge of discipline throughout the regiment.
  • Colour Serjeant - Bears the colours in battle.
  • Serjeant - Company NCO, assists the Serjeant Maj. with enforcing discipline.
  • Corporal - NCO in training.



Enlisted
The enlisted is what makes up the important part of the regiment. These men are highly trained, full capable infantrymen who make up the regiment. These men should be highly disciplined and dedicated to the regiment. Dedication is defined as attending events regularly, playing nicely with others in public servers, assisting in the recruitment process. Every member should strive to be better and better. Upon first joining the regiment you will start as a Recruit. After proving yourself active and ready to become an official member, you will be promoted. Promotions are given based on performance and dedication, so you should constantly be improving your game!

  • Lance Corporal - The senior-most enlisted man. He knows how to handle himself in combat along with being prudent in his activity and dedication.
  • Private - The backbone of the regiment; has proven he is dedicated and knows his way with bayonet.
  • Recruit - Entry-level rank. This man is being taught the ways of the line and is promoted after proving his dedication and activity.





36



With the outbreak of the Seven Years War, a decision was made to increase the size of the British Army. During the winter of 1756/57 a number of existing formed second battalions. The 3rd Regiment of Foot formed a second battalion on 10 December 1756. In September 1757 both battalions of the 3rd Foot took part in an assault of the French coast. They returned to England in October, and on 21 April 1758 the 2nd Battalion became the 61st Regiment of Foot, with Major General Granville Elliott as colonel. The new regiment retained the buff facings of the 3rd Foot.

In late 1758 the 61st Foot embarked for the West Indies. On 16 January 1759 they took part in the attempted Invasion of Martinique, but were forced to withdraw after three days. On 24 January they landed on Guadeloupe. Following more than three months of heavy fighting, the French forces surrendered on 1 May. The regiment returned to England in the summer of 1760 where they engaged in recruiting to make up for the casualties suffered in the West Indies.

After a period of garrison service in England, Ireland and the Channel Islands the 61st Foot was stationed on the island of Minorca in 1771. The island had become a British possession under the Treaty of Paris of 1763. By 1779 Britain was involved in a war with America, France and Spain, and in August 1781 a Franco-Spanish force began an attack. The 61st found themselves besieged in Fort St Philip. By February 1782 the garrison's numbers had been greatly reduced by dysentery and they surrendered. The remains of the regiment were repatriated in May 1782 where they began recruiting. In August 1782 all regiments of foot without a royal title were given a county designation, and the regiment became the 61st (South Gloucestershire) Regiment of Foot in 1782. In 1783 the regiment moved to Ireland where it remained until 1792. In the latter year they moved to Gibraltar.

***

In 1793 the French Revolutionary government declared war on Great Britain. The 61st were once again dispatched to the Caribbean, landing in Martinique in December 1794. In April 1795 they moved to St Lucia as part of the force under Brigadier-General James Stewart. Forced to return to Martinique three months later, in the following year they returned to St Lucia as part of a successful invasion. The regiment had suffered very heavy casualties and returned to England in October 1796 to be made up to strength. They moved to Guernsey in 1797, and to the Cape of Good Hope in 1799.
In 1801 the regiment proceeded to Egypt where they took part in the campaign to expel the French Armée d'Orient from the country. In 1802 the regiment was awarded the badge of a sphinx superscribed "Egypt" for display on the regimental colours in commemoration of the campaign.
In 1803 the regiment moved to Malta, and in July of the same year the existing regiment was redesignated as 1st Battalion, 61st (South Gloucestershire) Regiment of Foot when a second battalion was raised in County Durham and Northumberland. The 2nd Battalion was raised as part of the expansion of the army in response to the threat of invasion by France, and spent its entire existence in England and Ireland, before being disbanded in October 1814.
In November the First Battalion (or 1/61st) landed in Italy. Early in the following year they were forced to evacuate to Sicily, along with the deposed King Ferdinand IV. The flank companies 1/61st returned to the Italian mainland in June 1806 as part of the force commanded by Major-General John Stuart, and took part in the Battle of Maida on 4 July. The battalion returned to Sicily soon after. In 1807 they moved to Gibraltar.
In June 1809 the 1/61st landed in Lisbon, Portugal and joined the army fighting under Sir Arthur Wellesley in Spain. They took part in the Battle of Talavera on 27-28 July. The 1st Battalion, which had seen heavy casulaties, received a draft of 300 men from the 2nd Battalion in February 1810, bringing up to full strength. They saw action in a number of minor engagements taking part in the Battle of Salamanca (22 July 1812) and the Siege of Burgos (September - October 1812), the Battle of the Pyrenees (July - August 1813). They pursued the retreating French forces into France, fighting at the Battle of Nivelle (November 1813), Battle of the Nive (December 1813), Battle of Orthez (February 1814) and the Battle of Toulouse in April 1814. The battalion's commanding officer, Lieutenant-Colonel Robert John Coghlan was killed at Toulouse. Within a few days French forces had capitulated and the 1/61st was moved to Bordeaux.
The 1st Battalion landed in Cork, Ireland in July 1814, proceeding to Dundalk where it absorbed the abolished 2nd Battalion in October.


The 61st Foot spent more than thirty years on garrison duty before seeing active service again. From 1816-22 they were stationed in Jamaica, from 1822-28 in England and from 1828-40 in Ceylon. They were stationed in England and Ireland from 1840-45.[2] In 1845 they moved to India, fighting in the Second Anglo-Sikh War of 1848-49: at the Battle of Ramnagar (November 1848), Battles of Saddalupar and Chillianwala (December 1848- January 1849) and Battle of Gujrat (February 1849). The regiment was still in India when Indian Rebellion of 1857 broke out. They took part in the Siege of Delhi.

***

The remaining years of the 61st's existence as a separate regiment were uneventful. From India they moved to Mauritius in 1859 for a year before returning to England. Following garrison duty in the Channel Islands and Ireland, they moved to Bermuda in 1866 and Canada in 1870. In 1872 they moved to Ireland. In 1873, under the Cardwell Reforms, the United Kingdom was divided into 66 "Brigade Districts" which generally corresponded to one or more counties. A depot was to be established, which would the home for two regular infantry battalions. At any one time one of the regular battalions was to be on "home" service and the other on "foreign" duty, with the roles being rotated from time to time. The county militia regiments were also to share the depots. The 61st Foot were linked with the 28th (North Gloucestershire) Regiment of Foot, with a depot at Bristol. The 61st subsequently moved to the Channel Islands in 1875, England in 1876 and Malta in 1878. In 1880 they returned to India.
On 1 July 1881 the reforms of 1874 were carried to their logical conclusion when the 28th and 61st Regiments along with the militia regiments of Gloucestershire were amalgamated to form the Gloucestershire Regiment. The 61st Foot became 2nd Battalion, The Gloucestershire Regiment. Following two further amalgamations, the regiment's lineage is continued today by The Rifles.





In-game Flag:

In-game tags: 61st_Rec_Name
(In the 61st we highly encourage all of our member to use historical English names)

Teamspeak IP: 78.46.78.86 Download Here






Add an officer on steam








2. Fill out this Application and post it on this page
Code
1. Age?
2. Where are you from?
3. In-game Name?
4. Desired Historical Name? (There is a list on our TS to help you)
5. How did you hear about us?
6. On a scale of 1-10 what do you think your melee abilities are?
7. Can you attend 75% of the events listed above?
8. Why do you want to join the 61st?
9. Do you agree to behave and follow our Code of Conduct?[/center]





Officers
Colonel   Col
Lieutenant Colonel   LtCol
Major   Maj
Captain   Cpt
Lieutenant   Lt
Ensign   Ens
NCOs
Serjeant Major   SjtMaj
Colour Serjeant   CSjt
Serjeant   Sjt
Corporal   Cpl
Enlisted
Lance Corporal   LCpl
Private   Pte
Recruit   Rec





Commissoned Officers
Col. Arthur Collins
Lt. James Wolfe

Non-Commissioned Officers



Lance Corporals
LCpl. Francis Parker

Privates
Pte. Malcom Howell

Recruits
Rec. Richard Shape
Rec. Henry Parker
Rec. Jacob Milton


Reserves



(This is the North American Rifles Company)

Commissoned Officers


Non-Commissioned Officers
CSjt. William Wilson


Chosen Man


Privates


Recruits
Rec. Sporkee
Rec. Ivor Gyfforde







Thanks to Millander for the Roster Layout

Pages: 1 2 3