Author Topic: Legendary Regiments - Thread Collection - Mashup & Rework  (Read 2467 times)

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Offline Xephaeston

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Re: Legendary Regiments - Thread Collection - Mashup & Rework
« Reply #15 on: June 24, 2024, 03:36:58 pm »
72nd legendary basic german regiment ok ok
I'm open to listening to everyone. I'll do some research on the forum to gather information, should they make it onto the list or not.

Offline The_Joker

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Re: Legendary Regiments - Thread Collection - Mashup & Rework
« Reply #16 on: June 24, 2024, 04:50:55 pm »
72nd legendary basic german regiment ok ok
arent there lots of famous videos/clips where you (18e) lost to them even tho john price gave everything to rig it? germans2strong and 72nd is definetly legendary
« Last Edit: June 24, 2024, 04:53:02 pm by The_Joker »

Offline Xephaeston

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Re: Legendary Regiments - Thread Collection - Mashup & Rework
« Reply #17 on: June 24, 2024, 05:10:50 pm »
I did some research, and the 72nd definitely deserves a spot in this thread. I've watched several videos and explored this forum, and it's clear they were a force to be reckoned with that represented the German community with respect.

I'll update the thread later today with detailed criteria that regiments need to meet to be included, as the current guidelines are a bit vague.

Offline Vegi.

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Re: Legendary Regiments - Thread Collection - Mashup & Rework
« Reply #18 on: June 24, 2024, 05:15:30 pm »
92nd should get prioritised, cuz we are top 3 all-time in casual/competitive, thanks!
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Offline The_Joker

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Re: Legendary Regiments - Thread Collection - Mashup & Rework
« Reply #19 on: June 24, 2024, 05:48:11 pm »
I did some research, and the 72nd definitely deserves a spot in this thread. I've watched several videos and explored this forum, and it's clear they were a force to be reckoned with that represented the German community with respect.

I'll update the thread later today with detailed criteria that regiments need to meet to be included, as the current guidelines are a bit vague.
https://youtu.be/5TzJM74s01g?si=qIbFikGfbY0J2k7w&t=2428

Offline Vegi.

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Re: Legendary Regiments - Thread Collection - Mashup & Rework
« Reply #20 on: June 24, 2024, 05:51:21 pm »
I did some research, and the 72nd definitely deserves a spot in this thread. I've watched several videos and explored this forum, and it's clear they were a force to be reckoned with that represented the German community with respect.

I'll update the thread later today with detailed criteria that regiments need to meet to be included, as the current guidelines are a bit vague.
https://youtu.be/5TzJM74s01g?si=qIbFikGfbY0J2k7w&t=2428
Price rigging his shit is a fucking classic
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Offline Xephaeston

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Re: Legendary Regiments - Thread Collection - Mashup & Rework
« Reply #21 on: June 24, 2024, 07:17:44 pm »
As a side note, I will provide updates after the completion of each page. Since the roster information for regiments changes dynamically over time, I will use the current rosters as a baseline. If any important individuals who have significantly contributed to a regiment are missing, please let me know so I can make the necessary adjustments on each page.

Small update;
The 91st page is almost done. Only the rank structure and roster remain to be completed.

« Last Edit: June 24, 2024, 07:22:52 pm by YS23 »

Offline Salakien

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Re: Legendary Regiments - Thread Collection - Mashup & Rework
« Reply #22 on: June 24, 2024, 10:15:36 pm »

Ahoj ma bois, I would personally add 15thYR for obvious reasons (the most succesfull regiment ever), 18e, 45th, IVe as regiment even tho it was corp, 96y, 92nd both Donalds and Wolfee, 16th and tirdy turds (33rd) based on their great community, activity, longetivity and achievements. For NA I had a pleasure to be a part of great regiments like 30th led Purple and 58e led by Lawbringer. Also there were some good turkish and CIS regs which led the late phase of NW. Preobraz led by Nams for example. Skap

Thank you for the suggestions! The 15thYR is undoubtedly one of NW's finest regiments indeed, excelling under the command of both Falk and later Gi.

I will add every regiment you have listed later. However, I have some reservations about the Preobraz regiment from Nams and a few Turkish and CIS regiments in the later phase. Could you please provide more details about these regiments, either in a reply or through a personal message?



With that being said, the first regiment on the list, the 91st, will soon have its thread created. Based on my current assessment and the work completed thus far, I anticipate it will take approximately 2-3 days to finalize everything. This timeframe should allow me to ensure all details are thoroughly checked.


I was thinking about their presence in community and most of the time being a community place for almost whole region. For Preobraz I was thinking about creating a space for many new gen players with quite vigor activity in late to very stage of the game. Because I thought this thread is for ideas to create threads for regiments that had some good impact on the community and not just being succesfull in competetive scene of the game. So what I meant was that you could also try to research about regiments that were/are devoted to community development and getting a lot of fresh active players into NW community events. Just not being blinded by the competetive victories but getting a kinda a new perspective point of view that is new in this category. There are many lists and topics about competetive regiments and teams but almost no thread about the regiments that actually created the atmosphere of the game, the events, that kept this game so amazing for a decade. But Im just a gipsy. Skap

Offline Xephaeston

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Re: Legendary Regiments - Thread Collection - Mashup & Rework
« Reply #23 on: June 24, 2024, 10:30:36 pm »

Ahoj ma bois, I would personally add 15thYR for obvious reasons (the most succesfull regiment ever), 18e, 45th, IVe as regiment even tho it was corp, 96y, 92nd both Donalds and Wolfee, 16th and tirdy turds (33rd) based on their great community, activity, longetivity and achievements. For NA I had a pleasure to be a part of great regiments like 30th led Purple and 58e led by Lawbringer. Also there were some good turkish and CIS regs which led the late phase of NW. Preobraz led by Nams for example. Skap

Thank you for the suggestions! The 15thYR is undoubtedly one of NW's finest regiments indeed, excelling under the command of both Falk and later Gi.

I will add every regiment you have listed later. However, I have some reservations about the Preobraz regiment from Nams and a few Turkish and CIS regiments in the later phase. Could you please provide more details about these regiments, either in a reply or through a personal message?



With that being said, the first regiment on the list, the 91st, will soon have its thread created. Based on my current assessment and the work completed thus far, I anticipate it will take approximately 2-3 days to finalize everything. This timeframe should allow me to ensure all details are thoroughly checked.


I was thinking about their presence in community and most of the time being a community place for almost whole region. For Preobraz I was thinking about creating a space for many new gen players with quite vigor activity in late to very stage of the game. Because I thought this thread is for ideas to create threads for regiments that had some good impact on the community and not just being succesfull in competetive scene of the game. So what I meant was that you could also try to research about regiments that were/are devoted to community development and getting a lot of fresh active players into NW community events. Just not being blinded by the competetive victories but getting a kinda a new perspective point of view that is new in this category. There are many lists and topics about competetive regiments and teams but almost no thread about the regiments that actually created the atmosphere of the game, the events, that kept this game so amazing for a decade. But Im just a gipsy. Skap
That's great to hear. I am looking for regiments that not only demonstrated exceptional skill but were also highly respected and made significant contributions to the community. Palmares and an impressive performance in the competitive scene are just a few small aspects of the criteria for inclusion in this collection. I will add the Preobraz regiment to the list as well.

Offline Janne

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Re: Legendary Regiments - Thread Collection - Mashup & Rework
« Reply #24 on: June 24, 2024, 11:05:38 pm »
72nd legendary basic german regiment ok ok
arent there lots of famous videos/clips where you (18e) lost to them even tho john price gave everything to rig it? germans2strong and 72nd is definetly legendary
18e was a casual regiment u silly newgen TRASH bot 72nd was TRASH wannabe stack regiment but never achieved ANYTHING cus germans are just that weak SORRY but its true haha

Offline Xephaeston

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Re: Legendary Regiments - Thread Collection - Mashup & Rework
« Reply #25 on: June 24, 2024, 11:31:07 pm »
I appreciate everyone's passion for their regiments, but let's remember to keep things friendly and respectful. This topic is meant to bring us all together, taking a nostalgic trip back to the golden days when NW was at its peak.

The 91st thread should be ready later tonight, unless I end up snoozing behind my PC. Then it will be definitely for tomorrow.

Offline Vegi.

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Re: Legendary Regiments - Thread Collection - Mashup & Rework
« Reply #26 on: June 25, 2024, 12:41:25 am »
I appreciate everyone's passion for their regiments, but let's remember to keep things friendly and respectful. This topic is meant to bring us all together, taking a nostalgic trip back to the golden days when NW was at its peak.

The 91st thread should be ready later tonight, unless I end up snoozing behind my PC. Then it will be definitely for tomorrow.
First time on NW? lmao
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Offline Xephaeston

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Re: Legendary Regiments - Thread Collection - Mashup & Rework
« Reply #27 on: June 25, 2024, 12:55:00 am »
I'm specifically addressing this thread. If an individual's only intention is to troll, mock others, or spread negativity, I'd kindly suggest finding another thread or place to do so. This space is meant for thoughtful and respectful discussions, where we can share ideas and learn from one another in a positive environment. Let's keep this thread constructive and welcoming for everyone involved. I will remove unwelcome messages anyway if this persists, so there is no point in continuing with that negativity.

With that being said, the 91st thread will be ready tomorrow. Got a little creativity block and tired. Managed to do the lay-out of the rank structure still and tomorrow I will finish the last part which is the roster.

Ill update the main post as well tomorrow with the updated criteria and include the 91st thread.

Offline HRE Official

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Re: Legendary Regiments - Thread Collection - Mashup & Rework
« Reply #28 on: June 25, 2024, 08:23:49 am »
NA is missing the 2017-2019 staple of the community (post 63e)

Holy Roman Empire. We did an entire BBG vs HRE event.

https://youtu.be/e9EwC0-PCsA?t=40

Offline Xephaeston

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Re: Legendary Regiments - Thread Collection - Mashup & Rework
« Reply #29 on: June 25, 2024, 04:28:05 pm »
Spoiler
NA is missing the 2017-2019 staple of the community (post 63e)

Holy Roman Empire. We did an entire BBG vs HRE event.

https://youtu.be/e9EwC0-PCsA?t=40
Thank you for sharing this information. I'll look into it further and keep you informed with any updates.

I will soon be adding another regiment to the list: the 75e, which had a partnership with the 91st in the past. I believe it was led by MacAaron and included some excellent French players. If anyone has more information about this regiment and its roster, I would greatly appreciate your input.

Found a video of an invite in the 75e taking out almost a whole regiment himself around 1:10.



Currently working on the lay-out for the roster of the 91st thread. Should be ready today in the afternoon.

Update;

The 91st thread is now complete. I'll tidy up the main post and add the criteria as previously mentioned. Once that's done, I'll include the 91st thread in the main post as well. Afterward, I'll take a short break for a day or two. Feel free to discuss which regiments should be further on the list. The current list includes these regiments (for now):

EU;

➢ 6te Garde Grenadier Regiment - From DasBrot
➢ 8te Leib Grenadier Regiment - From Vampyr
➢ 54e Régiment d'Infanterie de Ligne - From Hadaki
➢ 77y Pehotniy Polk - From Aztir
➢ 84e Régiment d'Infanterie de Ligne - From Aldemar
➢ 5. Pułk Piechoty - From DaPietro
➢ K-KA, Kaiserlich und Königliche Armee - From PrideOfNi
➢ Infanterie Regiment Nr. 24 "Freiherr von Strauch" - From Hekko
➢ 2. Leib-Husaren Regiment - From Cooper/Ipoa
➢ 72nd 'Seaforth Highlanders' Regiment of Foot - From DarkTemplar
➢ Infanterie Regiment 'von Braunschweig-Oels' Nr. 12 - From ExoticFail
➢ 75e Régiment d'Infanterie de Ligne - From MacAaron
➢ 15th 'Yorkshire' Regiment of Foot "The Snappers" - From Falk and Gi
                          

NA;

➢ 12th 'East Suffolk' Regiment of Foot - From Tico
➢ 3e Régiment de Voltigeurs de la Garde Impériale - From Grimsight
➢ 63e Régiment d'Infanterie de Ligne - From Karth
➢ 16th 'Middlesex' London Irish Rifle Volunteer Corps - From Jetch, NickyJ and Ajax
➢ 71st "Highland" Regiment of Foot - From Cheeseypants
➢ 30th 'Cambridgeshire' Regiment of Foot - From Purplepanda
➢ Nr. 8 Leib-Grenadier-Regiment 'König Friedrich Wilhelm III.' - From RussianFury and Wastee
➢ 6te Silesian Landwehr Regiment - From Irish
➢ 58e Régiment d'Infanterie de Ligne - From Lawbringer
[close]

Since it will take a while for the 91st thread to be included in the main post, I will showcase it here for once. I am figuring out to redo the main post and it will take some time.

So hereby I present you the new thread for the 91st 'Argyllshire' Regiment of Foot from Tavington.



The 91st 'Argyllshire' Regiment of Foot - Intro

In the virtual realm of historical gaming, amidst the tumultuous landscapes of Napoleonic Wars simulations, the 91st 'Argyllshire' gaming clan emerged as a legendary force.

Led by visionary leaders like Colonel James Stewart (Tavington), the 91st quickly distinguished itself through a blend of tactical prowess and unwavering teamwork. Every
member, from seasoned officers to enthusiastic recruits, embodied the spirit of the regiment; dedicated to mastering the art of melee combat and mastering the intricacies
of the virtual battlefields of NW.

The clan's reputation for excellence spread swiftly across the NW community. Their presence at virtual events and tournaments was marked by an impressive turnout and
an unmatched competitive spirit. Whether storming the heights of a strategic fortress or defending against overwhelming odds, the 91st consistently showcased their
dominance through coordinated assaults and strategic maneuvers that mirrored historical military tactics.

At the heart of their online legacy was William Jones, known to fellow gamers as IEC, whose passion for capturing their virtual exploits knew no bounds. His meticulously
edited videos, shared across gaming platforms and forums, not only showcased the clan's skill and dedication but also drew in new recruits and admirers from around the
world. Each video became a testament to the 91st's unwavering commitment to excellence and their enduring impact on the virtual battlefield.

As the 91st 'Argyllshire' gaming clan continued to grow and evolve, their story became more than just victories and accolades. It became a testament to the power of
friendship forged in the fires of competition, the pursuit of virtual excellence, and the enduring legacy of a community bound by shared passion and mutual respect. In
every battle they fought and every event they attended, the 91st remained undeniably a force to be reckoned with—a testament to the spirit of gaming camaraderie and
virtual valor.

I hope you enjoy this new thread, created to honor their enduring legacy.


(some resources are taken from the official 91st thread. Credits and copyright go to the rightful owners)















Table of
Contents










Discover Who We Are! Dive into our story and learn about
our values, mission, and the people who make it all happen.
Explore our journey and understand the principles that
drive us forward.



















Explore the Official Hierarchy of the 91st Argyllshire
Regiment! Delve into the structured ranks and key positions
that defined this historic regiment. From the commanding
officers to the dedicated foot soldiers.



          



















Regimental History
Unveil the Secrets of the 91st Argyllshire Regiment! Delve
into the gripping history of this storied regiment and uncover
the epic battles they fought. Explore the intricate
organization and untold tales of valor that shaped the 91st
Argyllshire.



















Muster Roll
Examine the Comprehensive Official Muster Roll of the
91st Argyllshire Regiment! This detailed document provides
an extensive list of the brave individuals who served in this
esteemed regiment. Discover the names, ranks, and roles of
each member, offering a unique glimpse into the lives of
those who contributed to the regiment's storied legacy.












Get to know us
Introduction



The 91st Argyllshire Highlanders is a distinguished and disciplined Napoleonic Wars regiment,
known for its military precision and structured hierarchy. Our ranks are filled with a diverse array
of members, from seasoned veterans to eager new recruits. Everyone is welcome to join the 91st
Argyllshire Highlanders. New players will quickly learn to hold their ground in melee combat,
while veterans can refine their skills alongside other melee experts and pass on their knowledge
to newcomers. Discipline is the cornerstone of the 91st Argyllshire Highlanders, ensuring our
regiment remains structured and professional.
          We recognize and reward exceptional performance. Skilled melee fighters may earn a place in
the prestigious Grenadiers, while those who exemplify leadership and discipline can rise to the
rank of NCO. Our regiment is organized into three distinct companies: the Centre Company, the
Grenadiers, and the Light Company. Each plays a vital role in our operations and contributes to
our overall success on the battlefield. If you are interested in joining a serious, disciplined, and
skilled regiment, enlist today with the 91st Argyllshire Highlanders!





Argyll, Scotland                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     June, 1815

Tales of the Past
Regimental History





Formation and Trials of the 91st Highlanders

In 1793 George III wrote to John, 5th Duke of Argyll, asking him to raise a kilted regiment
of 1,100 men. The Duke was unwell at the time and deputed the task to his kinsman,
Duncan Campbell, 8th Lochnell. On 9 July 1794, they were formally gazetted into the
British Army as the 98th Argyllshire Highlanders, renumbered later, in October 1798, as
the 91st. On 5 May 1795 the Regiment embarked for South Africa to capture the Cape
of Good Hope from the Dutch. At this time 15 of the 33 officers were Campbells and 2
of the others had married Campbells. But the required number of NCOs and rank and
file could not be found in Argyllshire, the rest came largely from Glasgow and
Edinburgh, Renfrew and Paisley, with a small contingent of Irish. Officers continued to
be drawn mainly from Argyllshire, and there were always enough genuine Highlanders
to give the Regiment its characteristic stamp. Irish and Englishmen who only
reluctantly took to wearing the kilt were in the end successfully absorbed; and the
91st maintained their Highland tradition.

The 98th Highlanders arrived at Simonstown in September 1795, as part of a force
some 4,500 strong under Sir Alured Clarke, an ambitious officer for whom the
conquest of the Dutch colony at the Cape was the one great chance of achieving
military renown. But the luck was all against him. His Second-in-Command had
already forced a landing with the advance guard, and had driven the Dutch off
their only tenable defensive position in front of Cape Town. When, after a cautious
and leisurely disembarkation lasting no less than ten days, Sir Alured faced the now
vastly outnumbered Dutch at Wynberg, they cheated him of his great victory by
running away after one ragged volley, which cost his army one seaman killed and
17 soldiers wounded, 4 of them from the 98th. He made the best of a bad job with
a general order thanking his troops for 'their spirited exertions and cheerful
perseverance through every hardship' in terms which Wellington would have
thought fulsome after a major victory. So the 98th had, technically, their baptism
of fire, and settled down as the permanent garrison, to suffer for seven unhappy
years really serious casualties from the insalubrious climate and the insanitary
conditions in Cape Castle. They lost 11 dead in the first month; and they seldom
had less than 100 sick in hospital.

Much worse, however, for morale was the order in December to adopt the standard
uniform of the British Army in India. Lochnell had gone to vast trouble to fit them all out
with six yards each of the dark green Campbell tartan with the black stripe. For the rest
they wore the full Highland dress: scarlet coats faced with yellow for both officers and
men; black stocks, leather for rank and file, velvet for the officers; diced hose in red
and white with scarlet garters, and Highland shoes with yellow or gold oval shoe-
buckles. Lace with black and white cotton for NCOs and men, silver for officers; and
officers' epaulettes, when worn, were also of silver lace. All ranks wore the regulation
Highland feather bonnet and officers wore their own hair, clubbed over the ears with
red rosettes on each club and the queue tied with a black bow. All this had now to be
abandoned for garments no more suitable for hot climates than the kilt, and drearily
undistinguished: white trousers with black half-gaiters, scarlet tunics and absurd round,
black, felt hats, 'at least 6 inches high with a 4-inch brim', curled up at the sides, with
a plume over the left ear, white for the grenadier company, green for the light company
and black for battalion companies.


                                 

In this costume, deeply resented by all ranks, the 98th soldiered on as the Cape Town
garrison. There was little excitement to be had in a city of 1,200 houses inhabited by
5,000 free folk, Dutch and mixed races, and 10,000 black slaves. Food was cheap, but
widespread deforestation had made firewood extremely expensive and also deprived the
officers of any decent shooting. They improved their lot, however, by fetching out a
pack of foxhounds and hunting jackal, while the troops stagnated and went down in
large numbers with various local diseases. There was a brief flutter of military activity
when the Dutch attempted to recover their colony in 1796. Morale in the Regiment was
never allowed seriously to sink. With a typical Scots desire for self-improvement they
formed a regimental school, with a fee of 1s. a month; and from Scotland Lochnell
busied himself with the formation of a regimental band.

Thus, nothing very decisive had happened to the now renumbered 91st when, under
the terms of the Treaty of Amiens, they handed Cape Colony back to the Dutch and
reassembled at Bexhill in May 1803. They were much depleted in numbers, having
been heavily milked in their last months at the Cape to bring the regiments destined
for India up to full strength; and it took them more than a year to get back their full
Highland dress. From 1804 onwards the men were issued with six yards of tartan
every two years for the upkeep of their kilts. All ranks wore the Kilmarnock bonnet,
cocked, for fatigues and minor parades, covering it with the feather bonnet for
ceremonial occasions. The plaid became increasingly a purely ceremonial garment and
officers were forbidden the kilt as ball and dinner dress. To compensate, they were
allowed gold epaulettes instead of silver.

All this helped to keep up morale for another five years of inactive soldiering, moving
about southern England as part of the forces hopefully gathered to defeat Napoleon if the
admirals ever let him slip across the Channel. They had a brief hope of better things
when the Highland Brigade was sent to Hanover at the end of I805. But they were back
in Kent throughout 1806 and thereafter in Cork. Throughout all this they clearly remained
a very good regiment. They were ceaselessly inspected and invariably earned the 'Strong
Approbation' of the generals. The Commander- in-Chief, H.R.H. the Duke of York, was
'Highly Pleased' with them in 1805. Rather more significantly, Sir John Moore was
'Extremely Well Pleased'; and before they left Dublin, in June 1808, to join the army in
Portugal, they paraded for the Lord Lieutenant and gave him 'Great Satisfaction'.

The campaign was as disappointing for the 91st as it was for the nation as a whole. The
light company of the 91st was engaged at Rolica and had a sergeant severely wounded.
But the Regiment as a whole was in reserve and was not engaged in either of the major
battles. It was again in the reserve division for Sir John Moore's spectacular march to
Salamanca which disrupted Napoleon's whole campaign; and it came into its own at
last when the reserve division became the rearguard for the epic retreat which
culminated in Moore's victory and death at Corunna. The 91st had then more than their
fair share of privations and forced marches; and in the rearguard actions in which they
were engaged they lost 164 of all ranks killed, wounded or missing. At Corunna itself,
though 'in the very centre of the line and next the Guards', they were not heavily
engaged and lost only two men wounded.

'Corunna', nevertheless, was a worthily won Battle Honour to be placed on the Colours
beside 'Rolica' and 'Vimeira'.




Trials and Triumphs: The Journey of His Majesty's 91st Argyllshire Regiment





Now the 91st embarked upon the ill-faited Welcheren campaign,
the devastating low fever peculiar to the island of Walcheren had
already destroyed one British army 200 years before. This time,
from 3 September to 23 December, an army of 40,000 men lay
encamped there because the generals could not agree on what
to do with them. During these four months no less than 35,000
of them passed through the military hospitals to a precarious
convalescence or the grave. By 25 September, after only three
weeks, the 91st had only 246 rank and file fit for duty out of
608. From disease the Regiment lost a total of 218 dead - far
more than all their casualties in the Corunna campaign. During
the six months following their return to Kent they had an
average of 250 sick and it was quite impossible to train or drill
them to any acceptable standard. On top of this they were
deprived of even their trews and bonnets. Henceforth they
wore the blue-grey trousers and black cap of an English line
regiment: a uniform in which few of the troops and none of
the officers took the smallest pride.

All that remained of their origin was the Pipe Band and the
title of His Majesty's 91st Argyllshire Regiment. As such, they
rejoined Wellington in 1812. They missed Vitoria. But were
with the 6th Division at Sorauren on 28 and 30 July 1813, in
what Wellington called 'bludgeon work', they played a decisive
part in dislodging Marshal Soult from the positions he had
hoped to hold in the Pyrenees. On the first day the 91st
suffered heavily, losing 115 killed and wounded out of a total
strength of 821 . On the second day, when the brigaded light
companies bore the brunt, they got off lightly. But they clearly
played their full part in what even Wellington called 'desperate
fighting', adding that he had 'never known the troops behave
so well'.
                      


"Pyrenees" was another hard-won battle honour on the
91st Colours, marking their relentless perseverance. Yet, their
trials were far from over. Ahead awaited four more victories in
France: "Nivelle", "Nive", "Orthes", "Toulouse", and "Peninsula".
The first three, though not costly in lives, were fraught with
perils and moments of heroism. One such moment was the
battlefield promotion of Adjutant Lieutenant MacNeil of Colonsay,
who had two horses shot from under him during the fierce
crossing at Nivelle. Each honour etched into their Colours bore
witness to their valor and unyielding spirit amidst the chaos and
carnage of war. Amidst the tumult of battle, the 91st endured
harsh conditions and relentless enemy assaults, their resolve
unwavering. At "Toulouse", their decisive actions and
unwavering bravery turned the tide of battle, securing victory
against formidable odds. Their legacy as the 91st Argyllshire
Regiment endured, their Colours emblazoned with the names
of hard-fought battles that defined their courage and sacrifice.



At Toulouse, on 10 April 1814, Soult put up a last, desperate fight, which cost Wellington close on 5,000 casualties. Sir Denis Pack's Highland Brigade led the 6th Division attack brilliantly, ending up with
the 42nd and 78th holding three captured enemy redoubts, and the 91st in close support in a farmyard behind. The crunch came when a French column, 6,000 strong, counter-attacked. The 42nd were
driven back in some disorder, but the prompt support of the 91st gave them time to re-form; and the two battalions together then successfully restored the position. By the time the 91st got back to
their farmhouse the other wing was in trouble; once more they sallied out, restored the position and incidentally rescued a large party of the 78th who had been surrounded and were in danger of
being made prisoner. Every general present reckoned that only the prompt and vigorous support afforded by the Argyllshire Regiment had saved the Brigade at a very critical moment in the battle. So
the war ended for the 91st in a blaze of glory, with nine battle honours on the Regimental Colour. But at Waterloo they were left far on the right flank; and though they got the campaign medal, that
great battle was never inscribed on their Colours. One more fragment of military glory nevertheless came their way. The 2nd Battalion, raised purely as a feeder for the 1st, was a pretty motley crew.

At their annual inspection in 1809 the older men were still wearing out their forbidden kilts, the rest were wearing 'pantaloons, breeches, or trews', and they could only muster 130 all ranks. But their
acquisition three years later of a dynamic Commanding Officer, Lieutenant-Colonel Ottley, some able lieutenants and 309 disbanded militiamen, encouraged the War Department to bring them up to full
strength with all sorts of 'undesirables' - 'old, worn-out men', 'an inferior type of boy' and some displaced Swedes, Pomeranians and Hanoverians - and send them to the Baltic. They saw their first and
last action at the disastrous night attack on the fortress of Bergen-op-Zoom in 1814, and thanks to Ottley's training did very well. All four of the assaulting columns successfully stormed the outer walls,
only to be thrown back by superior numbers of veteran French troops manning the inner defences.

The Battalion withdrew in admirable order, leaving 13 officers and an unrecorded number of men wounded and losing altogether 45 killed or mortally wounded. So far as is known, the Surgeon and
Assistant Surgeon were the only unwounded to fall into enemy hands; and Sergeant-Major Cahill was commissioned in the field for saving the Regimental Colour when the Ensign carrying it went down.
So, having unexpectedly found a niche in military history, the 2nd Battalion came home to be disbanded after sending 240 men to the 1st Battalion for the Waterloo campaign.







Regimental
Rank Structure




Commissioned Officers





Colonel
The Colonel held the highest command, bearing ultimate
responsibility for the regiment's overall strategy, discipline, and
effectiveness. As the senior officer, the Colonel directed all major
operational decisions, coordinated with higher command
structures, and oversaw the implementation of orders and
strategies on the battlefield. They played a crucial role in
maintaining morale, fostering unit cohesion, and ensuring the
training and welfare of their soldiers. The Colonel's leadership
was instrumental in guiding the regiment through complex
maneuvers, making critical tactical decisions under pressure,
and leading by example. Their experience and command
presence were essential to the regiment's success and
reputation during the intense and often chaotic campaigns of
the Napoleonic Wars.
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Lieutenant Colonel
The Lieutenant Colonel played a pivotal role as the second-in-command, overseeing the
regiment's daily operations and ensuring its combat readiness. Acting as the principal
advisor to the Colonel, the Lieutenant Colonel was responsible for implementing
strategic directives, coordinating logistics, and maintaining discipline among the
troops. They often led the regiment in the Colonel's absence, making critical
decisions on the battlefield and ensuring the smooth execution of complex
maneuvers. Their leadership, experience, and ability to inspire confidence and
cohesion among the officers and enlisted men were vital to the regiment's success
and effectiveness in the highly dynamic and challenging environments of Napoleonic
warfare.
[close]




Major
The role of a Major was significant as they served as senior officers
responsible for overseeing the operational and administrative
aspects of the battalion. Majors played a crucial role in
translating strategic objectives into tactical plans, ensuring the
efficient deployment of troops, and coordinating maneuvers on
the battlefield. They were integral in maintaining discipline,
morale, and unit cohesion among the soldiers under their
command. Majors also liaised between the regimental
commander and the lower-ranking officers, providing guidance,
mentoring junior officers, and ensuring that orders were
executed promptly and effectively. Their leadership,
experience, and ability to make critical decisions under
pressure were essential to the regiment's readiness and
success in the complex and demanding campaigns of the
Napoleonic Wars.
[close]




Captain
The role of a Captain was crucial as they served as commissioned
officers responsible for commanding and leading a company of
soldiers. Captains were tasked with implementing the orders
of higher-ranking officers, devising tactical plans, and ensuring
the discipline and readiness of their men both in camp and on
the battlefield. They played a central role in coordinating
maneuvers, directing firefights, and rallying troops during
engagements against enemy forces. Captains also bore the
responsibility of maintaining morale, fostering camaraderie
among their soldiers, and ensuring the welfare and training of
their men. Their leadership, strategic thinking, and ability to
adapt to rapidly changing battlefield conditions were essential
to the regiment's success and effectiveness in the tumultuous
Napoleonic campaigns.
[close]




Lieutenant
A Lieutenant was pivotal as they served as junior
commissioned officers responsible for leading and
commanding soldiers in combat. Lieutenants
played a critical role in executing the orders of
higher-ranking officers, translating strategic plans
into tactical actions on the battlefield. They led
their men with courage and determination, often
at the forefront of engagements, and were
responsible for maintaining discipline, morale,
and unit cohesion during intense combat
situations. Beyond their combat duties,
Lieutenants also played a role in administrative
tasks such as overseeing training, logistics, and
the welfare of their soldiers. Their leadership,
tactical acumen, and ability to inspire and lead
by example were essential to the regiment's
success and effectiveness in the Napoleonic
Wars.
[close]




Ensign
An Ensign was vital as they were commissioned
officers responsible for the regiment's colours
and morale. Ensigns were typically young
officers, often in their late teens or early
twenties, who carried and protected the
regimental flag in battle. Their duties included
rallying troops around the colours, leading by
example, and maintaining the regiment's
traditions and spirit. Beyond their ceremonial
role, Ensigns also had responsibilities in
administration and leadership, assisting
senior officers in planning and executing
tactical maneuvers. Their presence on the
battlefield symbolized courage and
commitment, and their actions inspired
confidence among the ranks during the
intense and often chaotic conditions of
Napoleonic warfare.
[close]
                                        Non-Commissioned Officers





Serjeant Major
The Serjeant Major held one of the highest non-commissioned
officer positions, playing a critical role in maintaining discipline,
organization, and operational readiness. They were responsible for
overseeing the administrative functions of the regiment, including
logistics, supplies, and personnel management. The Serjeant
Major also served as the chief assistant to the regimental
commander, helping to implement orders and ensuring effective
communication throughout the ranks. During battles, they played
a crucial role in coordinating movements, maintaining morale, and
ensuring the regiment operated as a cohesive unit. Their
experience, leadership, and dedication to duty were essential in
upholding the regiment's effectiveness and morale during the
tumultuous campaigns of the Napoleonic Wars.
[close]




Colour Serjeant
The Colour Serjeant held a prestigious and crucial role. As the
senior non-commissioned officer responsible for the regimental
colours, they bore the responsibility of safeguarding and carrying
the regiment's flags into battle. The regimental colours
symbolized honor, identity, and morale, making the Colour
Serjeant's role not only ceremonial but also strategic. They were
tasked with rallying troops around the colours, ensuring they
were protected at all costs, and leading by example in the heat
of battle. Beyond their ceremonial duties, Colour Serjeants also
held leadership responsibilities akin to regular Serjeants,
overseeing discipline, training, and the execution of tactical
maneuvers. Their role was pivotal in maintaining the regiment's
cohesion and morale, embodying the pride and tradition of the
regiment on the battlefield during the Napoleonic Wars.
[close]




Serjeant
A Serjeant (or Sergeant) was pivotal as they held significant
responsibilities in both leadership and administration. Serjeants were
senior non-commissioned officers tasked with maintaining discipline
among the troops, overseeing the training and readiness of soldiers,
and executing the tactical plans devised by officers during battles.
They served as the backbone of the regiment, providing guidance
and supervision to lower-ranked soldiers, including Corporals and
Privates. Serjeants also played a critical role in enforcing military
regulations, ensuring that equipment and supplies were properly
maintained, and facilitating communication between officers and
enlisted men. Their experience, expertise in drill and tactics, and
leadership on the battlefield were essential to the regiment's
effectiveness and success in engagements against enemy forces
during the Napoleonic Wars.
[close]




Corporal
A Corporal was essential as they served as the immediate supervisors
and leaders of small groups of soldiers. Corporals were responsible
for maintaining discipline, overseeing the execution of orders, and
ensuring that tactical maneuvers were carried out effectively
during battles. They played a crucial role in training and drilling
recruits, preparing them for the rigors of warfare. Corporals also
acted as intermediaries between the officers and the enlisted men,
conveying orders and ensuring that communication flowed
smoothly within the regiment. Their experience, tactical acumen,
and ability to inspire and lead soldiers in combat were vital to the
regiment's operational success and cohesion on the battlefield.
[close]
                                        Enlisted Men





Lance Corporal
The role of a Lance Corporal was pivotal as they
served as junior non-commissioned officers
tasked with both leadership and operational
responsibilities. Positioned between the rank
of Private and Corporal, Lance Corporals
assisted in maintaining discipline among the
troops, ensuring adherence to orders, and
supporting the training of newer recruits.
They played a crucial role in the chain of
command, often leading small groups in
tactical maneuvers during battles and
providing a link between officers and enlisted
men. Their experience and leadership skills
were invaluable in maintaining unit cohesion
and effectiveness on the battlefield, where
they contributed to the regiment's overall
operational readiness and success in
engagements against enemy forces.
[close]




Private
A private was the backbone of the military force, performing
essential duties both in camp and on the battlefield. Privates
were responsible for maintaining their equipment, following
strict military drills, and executing orders from their
superiors with precision. On the battlefield, they formed the
core of infantry units, engaging in line infantry tactics that
involved coordinated volleys of musket fire and disciplined
bayonet charges. Their unwavering discipline and ability to
work as part of a larger unit were crucial for the regiment's
effectiveness in combat. Despite their often grueling and
perilous conditions, the role of the private was fundamental
to the success of Napoleonic military campaigns, as they
provided the manpower and determination necessary to
achieve victory.
[close]




Recruit
Recruits played a crucial role as the foundation of the military force.
These new soldiers, often young and inexperienced, underwent
rigorous training to transform them into disciplined and effective
combatants. Their duties included learning basic military drills,
mastering the use of muskets and bayonets, and understanding
battlefield tactics. Despite their initial lack of experience, recruits
were vital for maintaining the regiment's strength and numbers,
ensuring that seasoned soldiers could rely on fresh
reinforcements during prolonged campaigns. Their progression
from raw recruits to battle-ready soldiers was essential for the
regiment's operational success and overall effectiveness in the
Napoleonic Wars.
[close]








Argyllshire, 91st Highland Reg't
Regimental Muster Roll




Regimental Command

Col. James Stewart (Tavington)
Lt. Col. John Sinclair (Tiberias)









Recruit Company


Rec. Adam MacThomas (Adam)
Rec. Aeneas MacFarlan (NevraigK)
Rec. Alan Abercrombie (Diplex)
Rec. Alexander Cameron (Apollo)
Rec. Alexander MacMillan (Alexander)
Rec. Alistar MacKintosh (Euronymous)
Rec. Allan MacCulloch (jimmypiggie)
Rec. Archibald Monroe (Arch)
Rec. Charles Stewart (Conor)
Rec. Chris MacNab (Elkhound)
Rec. Colin MacKenzie (Mowie)
Rec. Daniel Turner (DaMattou)
Rec. David Smith (Kenway)
Rec. Donald MacDonald (Bowsie)
Rec. Ewan MacLellan (von_Dobeln)
Rec. Harry Anderson (Michael)
Rec. Harry MacPhee (Jakjakx93)
Rec. James Cook (Tank)
Rec. James Young (Eryximachos)
Rec. John Little (MatsPepsi)
Rec. John Pitcairn (Jules)
Rec. Keith MacFarlan (Felnyr)
Rec. Leonard Stark (Letix1)
Rec. Marcel MacNab (Marcel)
Rec. Richard MacDuff (Kris2ffer)
Rec. Roderick MacGregor (Flappy)
Rec. Thomas Fraser (Vaska)
Rec. Tim MacTagin (Dan)
Rec. Tobias MacAllister (BreadPieMan)
Rec. William Couper (LucasFrost)
Rec. William MacFarlan (Cambronne)



31 members
                     Centre Company - Colonel Stewart's

Commissioned Officers

Cpt. Hector MacKay (Tali)
Lt. William C. Gray (Chimaeira)
Ens. Adam Anderson (Jigstas)


Non-Commissioned Officers

Sjt-Maj. David Stewart (JackieChan)
CSjt. Lister Bashnell (Builticus)
Sjt. James Watson (Franciscus)
Sjt. Mark Dawson (Mark)
Cpl. Angus MacGrigor (MacFungus)
Cpl. James Arthur (mem95)
Cpl. Richard Nixon (Mebphis)
Cpl. Robert Marshell (Xeratarth)


Enlisted Men

LCpl. Ian Clark (Guille)
LCpl. William Jones (IEC)
LCpl. Alexander Morgan (Blitz)
LCpl. Alexander Campbell (Deans)
Pte. Alexander Locke
Pte. Alexander MacKenzie (ArmanTheChin)
Pte. Angus Cameron (Sandy)
Pte. Archibald McPhail (otocar91)
Pte. David Anderson (Sourcream)
Pte. David Lyon (Lyon)
Pte. Edward Hart (killershark007)
Pte. Farrel MacDonald (Pazza)
Pte. Hector Cunningham (GunterTheFurry)
Pte. Ian MacKay (Cracky)
Pte. James Campbell (Av3ng3r)
Pte. John Bower (Oldprobulldog)
Pte. John Gray (Borisoff)
Pte. John Stewart (Erebor)
Pte. Oliver Mulgrew (Winefrog)
Pte. Robert MacLeoud (WolverineV)
Pte. Robert Ramsey (Roughstone)
Pte. Ryan Patterson (Patterbuns)
Pte. Scott Roderick (Ryan)
Pte. Terry MacLeod (Mazer)
Pte. Will Smith (Warlordss)



36 members
                     Grenadier Company - Major Munro's

Commissioned Officers

Maj Alexander Munro (Ragni)
Lt. Fillan MacFarlan (Old Guard)


Non-Commissioned Officers

Sjt. Edward Kennedy (Eddie)
Sjt. Andrew Hood (Frankzy)
Cpl. Ben Dover (Phreak)
Cpl. James Clark (JamesRyan)
Cpl. John Scott (Arcturus)
Cpl. Ferdinand Young (Elling)


Enlisted Men

LCpl. Alexander MacFarlan (Jordan)
LCpl. John Campbell (Superstorm)
LCpl. Peter Robertson (Varga)
LCpl. Theodore Ross (Teddy)
Pte. Alexander Ferguson (Razvan)
Pte. Alexander Johnston (Haltan)
Pte. Alistair Cameron (dotoshiro)
Pte. Andrew Grayham (Gobezor)
Pte. Andrew Peacock (pineapple)
Pte. Charles Gordon (Humz33)
Pte. Charles Reddin (ccgr1121)
Pte. Donald Stark (Winchester)
Pte. Evan MacFarlan (Tardet)
Pte. Ian MacFarlan (MacAaron)
Pte. James Wiedeke (wiedeke)
Pte. John Masterson (PlasticParagon)
Pte. John MacLean (Dinkcool)
Pte. Kenneth Montgomery (Innocence)
Pte. Patrick Rowny (hakeruss)
Pte. Peter MacFarlan (Genie)
Pte. Richard Sutherland (hairywarhero)
Pte. Ryan MacMiller (paratrooper)
Pte. Simon Stark (Simon)
Pte. William Wilson (CruelHamster)



32 members
                     




Reserve company


Pte. Daniel
Pte. Evan Fraser (Evanovic)
Pte. George Aitkin (CatchThePigeon)
Pte. George Horsburgh (Ser Cuddles)
Pte. George MacFie (Blade)
Pte. Hugh Stewart (MT032)
Pte. Ian MacPherson (Ralofson)
Pte. Jakub Murrey (MacTomas)
Pte. John Telford (Telford)
Pte. John Thomson (NeedSomeMore)
Pte. Martin MacWise (Wiseman)
Pte. Pixelhound
Pte. Robert Hood (Sakura)
Pte. Robert McLeoud (Juvens)
Pte. Robin Hood (Sid)
Pte. Sherlock Vorlenings (Vorlen)



16 members





« Last Edit: June 25, 2024, 04:45:18 pm by YS23 »