Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Topics - Garrel

Pages: 1
1
Union / 27th New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment - "Union Regiment"
« on: January 25, 2018, 05:11:07 am »

W.I.P
Thread Coming Soon!

Spoiler
Quick Details
- EU/NA regiment.
- Semi-serious, regiment mainly for fun.
- Light Infantry
[close]


2
Regiments / 91st 'Argyllshire Highlanders' Regiment of Foot
« on: March 20, 2017, 09:13:18 pm »




Historical Overview - 91st 'Argyllshire Highlanders' Regiment of Foot

George III ordered John, Duke of Argyll, to raise a kilted regiment of 1,100 men. The Duke requested assistance from his kinsman, Duncan Campbell, and on the 9th of July, 1794, they were formally gazetted into the British Army as the 98th (Argyllshire Highlanders) Regiment of Foot, later to be renumbered as the 91st. On the 5th of May, 1795, the regiment embarked for South Africa to capture the Dutch colony in the Cape of Good Hope. The 98th Highlanders arrived at Simonstown in September of 1795 as part of a force of around 4,500 men under the command of Sir Alured Clarke, an ambitious officer who sought great military renown in the conquest of the Dutch colony, but luck fell against him. His second-in-command landed forces and had driven the Dutch off their defensive position in front of Cape Town. After a cautious disembarkation lasting ten days, Sir Alured faced the vastly outnumbered Dutch at Wynberg, who retreated after giving one volley, which killed one seaman and wounded 17 others total.

So the 98th, technically, was baptised in fire, settling down as the garrison for seven unhappy years, where they faced heatstroke and disease, and a uniform change which served no better in the climate than their original. Upon the regiments renumbering to 91st, they had left Cape of Good Hope to the Dutch after the Treaty of Amiens, and gathered at Bexhill in May of 1803. Depleted in numbers after sending men to replenish garrisons in India, it took them years to be restored to strength, as well as have their old uniform returned to them. The boosts in confidence had inspired the 91st during their return to England as part of the forces gathered in hopes to defeat Napoleon if the admirals ever allowed him to cross the British Channel. In 1805, the Highland Brigade was sent to Hannover, but they were sent back to Kent in 1806. Throughout all of these relocations, they had remained a very good regiment. They were inspected ceaselessly and earned the 'Strong Approbation' of the generals. The Commander-in-Chief, H.R.H and Duke of York, was 'Highly Pleased' with them in 1805. Even more so, Sir John Moore was 'Extremely Well-Pleased'; and before they left Dublin in June of 1808 to join the amassing army in Portugal, they paraded for the Lord Lieutenant. At Waterloo they were left far on the right flank; and though they got the campaign medal, that great battle was never inscribed on their Colours. One more fragment of military glory nevertheless came their way. They saw their first and last action at the disastrous night attack on the fortress of Bergen-op-Zoom in 1814, and thanks to Ottley's training did very well.


The campaign in Portugal was disappointing for the 91st. The light company was engaged at Rolica, but the regiment as a whole was in reserve and had not engaged in either major battle. It was again in the reserve division for Sir John Moore's march to Salamanca which disrupted Napoleon's whole campaign; and it came into its own at last when the reserve division became the rearguard for the retreat which culminated in Moore's victory at Corunna. The 91st had more than their fair share of privations and forced marches and losses while in the rearguard. At Corunna itself, though 'in the very centre of the line and next to the Guards', they were not heavily engaged. 'Corunna', nevertheless, was a worthily won Battle Honour to be placed on the Colours beside 'Rolica' and 'Vimeira'. Now the 91st embarked on the Welcheren campaign. From September 3rd to 23 December 23rd, an army of 40,000 men lay encamped there because the generals could not agree on what to do with them. During these four months no less than 35,000 of them passed through the military hospitals or the grave. By September 23rd, after only three weeks, the 91st had only 246 rank and file fit for duty. From disease the regiment lost a total of 218 dead - far more than all their casualties in the Corunna campaign. They rejoined Wellington in 1812, thus missing Vitoria, but were with the 6th Division at Sorauren on 28th and 30th of July, 1813, in what Wellington called 'bludgeon work', they played a decisive part in dislodging Marshal Soult from the positions he hoped to hold in the Pyrenees.

On the first day the 91st suffered 115 killed and wounded out of a total strength of 821 . On the second day, when the brigaded light companies bore the brunt, they got off lightly, but clearly played their full part in what even Wellington called 'desperate fighting', adding that he had 'never known the troops behave so well'. 'Pyrenees' was another battle honour on the 91st Colours which was well and truly earned. They were to win five more in France: 'Nivelle', 'Nive', 'Orthes', 'Toulouse', and 'Peninsula'. The first three were not costly, and the only distinction was the promotion in the field of the Adjutant, Lieutenant MacNeil of Colonsay after he had had two horses killed under him at the passage of the Nivelle. At Toulouse, on 10th of April, 1814, Soult put up a last fight, which cost Wellington almost 5,000 casualties. Sir Denis Pack's Highland Brigade led an attack brilliantly, ending with the 42nd and 78th holding three captured enemy redoubts, and the 91st in close support in a farmyard behind. The crunch came when a French column, 6,000 strong, counter-attacked.

Introduction to the 91st Regiment of Foot

The 91st Regiment of Foot was formed by old and new players of the community, as a small number of members in February 2017. They, being veterans of other Napoleonic Wars and Anglo-Zulu War regiments, we wanted to create an atmosphere of respect, fun, and entertainment while playing both NW and AZW.

We achieve this by focusing on using excessive teamwork and tactics while playing the game. Our prime goals are to provide that same sense of comradery in and out of NW and AZW, also into our other games we play. Our rank structure promotes a meaningful, but not overdone, organisation and individuals with our focus on using historical line tactics and commands.

We boast over almost half a year of experience, and over this time, the regiment is anything but average. We are consistently welcoming new players and focus on bringing players in that mesh with our attitudes and ideals. Many of those members have stayed and remain here to this day. Rank advancement is possible, we have no set limit for any ranks, and take those that can showcase their capabilities in and out of game, and have shown dedication to the regiment over time.

We respect and ask that all new members respect everyone in this community, and we endeavour to achieve this goal daily. In addition to our consistency in Napoleonic Wars and Anglo-Zulu War, we play a wide variety of games and encourage members to play together. We have members that turn up multiple times zones, so in the event you’re staying up late, we are certain that you will have someone to play with! Our current list of games changes consistently, so if you are even remotely interested in playing with us, whether you are a veteran of Napoleonic Wars or a beginner, no matter the age, you are welcome to join us, just add one of the following recruitment liaisons on Steam. See you on the battlefield!



Our aim in Napoleonic Wars & Anglo-Zulu War

The 91st will mainly focus on participating in weekly-based linebattles and sieges aswell as AZW. The regiment will mainly focus on improving their shooting and melee to compete in future 1v1s and 2v2s against other regiments, trainings will also be set throughout the week to get our members to their peak performance in the game. On the other hand, we will be jumping onto public servers to have a laugh and to enjoy ourselves, other than that we will not only go as line infantry but also role-play as other units such as light infantry or artillery. Our accomplish in Napoleonic Wars to become a fun and non-serious regiment to keep the entertainment at its highest point.

Recruit Guidebook

The individuals of the regiment are constantly cheerful when a new member joins in. We will willingly welcome all those who show interest by joining the regiment. Once joined the regiment, Recruits are expected to show great dedication and motivation towards the regiment as well as improving their melee and shooting in-game. If you are active and attend 2 events within the week, it will award you a promotion to the rank of Private and from there, you will slowly but surely progress through the ranks will melee skills and discipline. If you, however, encounter a problem within the regiment or your not to sure about something, then do please contact one of the Commanding Officers or a Non-Commissioned Officer as they will always be available at your disposal and would really want to help.



3
Regiments / 44e Régiment d'Infanterie de Ligne - "As de Pique" |EU|
« on: January 03, 2017, 01:30:53 pm »




Historical Overview - 44e Régiment d'Infanterie de Ligne

The Napoleonic Wars (1803–1815) were a series of major conflicts pitting the French Empire and its allies, led by Napoleon I, against a fluctuating array of European powers formed into various coalitions, primarily led and financed by the United Kingdom. The wars resulted from the unresolved disputes associated with the French Revolution and the Revolutionary Wars, which had raged on for years before concluding with the Treaty of Amiens in 1802. The resumption of hostilities the following year paved the way for more than a decade of constant warfare often categorized into five conflicts: the War of the Third Coalition (1805), the War of the Fourth Coalition (1806–7), the War of the Fifth Coalition (1809), the War of the Sixth Coalition (1813), and the War of the Seventh Coalition (1815). The Napoleonic Wars had profound consequences for global and European history, leading to the spread of nationalism and liberalism, the rise of the British Empire as the world's premier power, the independence movements in Latin America and the collapse of the Spanish Empire, the fundamental reorganization of German and Italian territories into larger states, and the establishment of radically new methods in warfare. Napoleon became the First Consul of France in 1799, then Emperor five years later. Inheriting the political and military struggles of the Revolution, he created a state with stable finances, a strong central bureaucracy, and a well-trained army. The British frequently financed the European coalitions intended to thwart French ambitions. By 1805, they had managed to convince the Austrians and the Russians to wage another war against France. In response, Napoleon rapidly marched the Grand Army into the heart of Central Europe, demolishing the isolated Austrian forces during the Ulm Campaign before scoring a historic victory against the Allies at the Battle of Austerlitz in December 1805. At sea, the Royal Navy destroyed a combined Franco-Spanish fleet at Trafalgar in October 1805, securing British control of the seas for the remainder of the wars. Prussian worries about increasing French power led to the formation of the Fourth Coalition in 1806. The French quickly defeated the Prussians at the battles of Jena and Auerstedt, then Napoleon marched the Grand Army deep into Eastern Europe and annihilated the Russians in June 1807 at the Battle of Friedland.

The 44e Régiment d'Infanterie is an infantry regiment of the French Army created during the Revolution from the regiment of Orleans, a French regiment of the Ancient Régiment created in 1642 under the name of the regiment Mazarin-Italian. Nicknamed the "Ace of Spades" during the war of 1914-1918. Hoping to extend the Continental System and choke off British trade with the European mainland, Napoleon invaded Iberia and declared his brother Joseph the King of Spain in 1808. The Spanish and the Portuguese revolted with British support. The Peninsular War lasted six years, featured extensive guerrilla warfare, and ended in victory for the Allies. The Continental System caused recurring diplomatic conflicts between France and its client states, especially Russia. Unwilling to bear the economic consequences of reduced trade, the Russians routinely violated the Continental System and enticed Napoleon into another war. The French launched a major invasion of Russia in the summer of 1812. The resulting campaign witnessed the collapse and retreat of the Grand Army along with the widespread destruction of Russian lands and cities. In 1813, Prussia and Austria joined Russian forces in a Sixth Coalition against France. A lengthy military campaign culminated in a large Allied army defeating Napoleon at the Battle of Leipzig in October 1813. The Allies then invaded France and captured Paris in the spring of 1814, forcing Napoleon to abdicate in April. He was exiled to the island of Elba near Rome and the Bourbons were restored to power. However, Napoleon escaped from Elba in February 1815 and took control of France once again. The Allies responded by forming a Seventh Coalition, which defeated Napoleon at the Battle of Waterloo in June. The Congress of Vienna, which started in 1814 and concluded in 1815, established the new borders of Europe and laid out the terms and conditions that ended the wars. Napoleon seized power in 1799, creating a de facto military dictatorship. There are a number of opinions on the date to use as the formal beginning of the Napoleonic Wars; 18 May 1803 is often used, when Britain and France ended the only short period of peace between 1792 and 1814. The Napoleonic Wars began with the War of the Third Coalition, which was the first of the Coalition Wars against the First French Republic after Napoleon's accession as leader of France. Britain ended the Treaty of Amiens and declared war on France in May 1803.

Introduction to the 44e Régiment d'Infanterie de Ligne

The 44e Régiment d'Infanterie was formed by old and new players of the community, as a small number of members in April 2017. They, being veterans of other Napoleonic War regiments, we wanted to create an atmosphere of respect, fun, and entertainment while playing NW.

We achieve this by focusing on using excessive teamwork and tactics while playing the game. Our prime goals are to provide that same sense of comradery in and out of NW and into our other games we play. Our rank structure promotes a meaningful, but not overdone, organisation and couples with our focus on using historical line tactics and commands.

We brag over many years of enjoyment and experience, and over this time, the regiment is anything but average. We are consistently welcoming new players and focus on bringing players in that mesh with our attitudes and ideals. Many of those members have stayed and remain here to this day. Rank advancement is possible, we have no set limit for any ranks, and take those that can showcase their capabilities in and out of game, and have shown dedication to the regiment over time. We respect and ask that all new members respect everyone in this community, and we endeavour to achieve this goal daily. In addition to our consistency in Napoleonic Wars, we play a wide variety of games and encourage members to play together. We have members that turn up multiple times zones, so in the event, you’re staying up late, we are certain that you will have someone to play with! Our current list of games changes consistently, so if you are even remotely interested in playing with us, whether you are a veteran of Napoleonic Wars or a beginner, no matter the age, you are welcome to join us, just add one of the following recruitment liaisons on Steam. See you on the battlefield!



Our aim in Napoleonic Wars

The 44e will mainly focus on participating in weekly-based linebattles and sieges. The regiment will mainly focus on improving their shooting and melee to compete in future 1v1s and 2v2s against other regiments, trainings will also be set throughout the week to get our members to their peak performance in the game. On the other hand, we will be jumping onto public servers to have a laugh and to enjoy ourselves, other than that we will not only go as line infantry but also role-play as other units such as light infantry or artillery. Our accomplish in Napoleonic Wars is to become a fun and non-serious regiment to keep the entertainment at its highest point.

Cadet Guidebook

The individuals of the regiment are constantly cheerful when a new member joins in. We will willingly welcome all those who show interest by joining the regiment. Once joined the regiment, Cadets are expected to show great dedication and motivation towards the regiment as well as improving their melee and shooting in-game. If you are active and attend 2 events within the week, it will award you a promotion to the rank of Soldat de Deuxième and from there, you will slowly but surely progress through the ranks with melee skills and discipline. If you, however, encounter a problem within the regiment or your not to sure about something, then do please contact one of the Commanding Officers or a Non-Commissioned Officer as they will always be available if you need help with any issues.



4
Community / Neptune Designs - Headers & Signatures
« on: December 24, 2016, 10:14:19 pm »

« Requests Available »



Code
Header Title/Text:
Steam:
Images to use (Preferably put links):
Any Effects (Smoke/Blood/Other):
Type of Colours that can be used?:
Type of Header (Regiment/Clan/Personal):

5








The 4e Régiment d'Infanterie was reformed by members of old and new.
If you are looking for a regiment that is not serious and
not too competitive add FinnyBoySPA on steam.

Banner

4e_Rank_Name

Ranks
   

Commissioned Officers

Lieutenant

Non-Commissioned Officers

Adjudant-Chef
Adjudant
Sergent-Major
Sergent
Élève Sous-Officier

Enlisted

Caporal-Fourrier
Caporal
Soldat de Première Vétéran
Soldat de Première
Soldat de Deuxième
Cadet

[close]



Steam: FinnyBoySPA

TeamSpeak: Given out after contact.

If you would like to organise an event with the 4e or
talk to one of its members or officers then either add
the Steam name above.
Also if you are a member of the regiment you are expected
to have FinnyBoySPA on Steam.

Monday - Free Day   
Tuesday - Free Day
Wednesday - Free Day
Thursday - Free Day
Friday - Casual Event at 9:00pm GMT / BST
Saturday - 1st Div vs UB Event at 9:00 pm GMT / BST
Sunday - Siege Event at 9:00 pm GMT / BST



Quote
In-Game Name:
Previous Regimental Experience:
Steam Name:
Nationality:
Age*:


Signatures



[close]
Gallery

WIP

[close]
Banner re-skin


Made by. Mack

[close]





Thread provided by Rival



6





|Information|



The 92nd is a European-based Regiment on Napoleonic Wars.
Our members range to very experienced with a few years spent on the game to new players that are striving to improve, with all members striving to improve the 92nd as well as their personal playing skills. There are trainings once at the start of every week. Though optional, these trainings are here to provide practice, improvement in skill, helpful sessions about tactics and general game-play, also to those who make every effort for it, progression towards promotions. The Regiment also provides leadership openings to those who have served with activity, loyalty, and reliability, but are only approved to those who seek leading, providing a relaxed experience for the players who simply wish to play and have fun with their community.
 



92nd_Rank_Forename_Surname

Nickname: The Gordons
Regimental March:


|Application Format|


In-Game Name:
Previous Regimental Experience (if any):
Steam Name:
Nationality:
Age*:

*You have to be 14 or above to join the 92nd.

Make sure to add one of the officers on Steam!








|Roster|


Commissioned Officers:

Captain. Gordon MacKenzie


Non-Commissioned Officers:

Corporal. Brook David


Enlisted Men:

Centre Company
Lance-Corporal. John Kennedy

Grenadier. John MacKenzie

Private. James Cumming
Private. Ronald MacDonald
Private. Scott MacDonald
Private. Duncan MacLean
Private. Alexander Shand
Private. George Williams
Private. Donald Shacks
Private. Alexander Gordon

Total: 12
 
[close]
Training Company
Recruit. John Ross
Recruit. Alex MacGregor
Recruit. Abraham Williams
Recruit. Crawford Hugh
Recruit. Angus MacTavish
Recruit. Archibald MacKay
Recruit. Angus Ross
Recruit. William Fyfe
Recruit. Alexander Ellis
Recruit. Gregor MacGregor

Total: 10
 
[close]


|Ranks|

Commissioned Officers

Captain (Cpt)

Lieutenant (Lt)

Ensign (Ens)

[close]
Non-Commissioned Officers

Serjeant Major (SjtMaj)

Colour Serjeant (CSjt)

Serjeant (Sjt)

Corporal (Cpl)

[close]
Enlisted Men

Lance Corporal (LCpl)

Grenadier (Gren)

Private (Pte)

Recruit (Rec)

[close]


|History|


In 1794 Britain had just entered the French Revolutionary Wars and needed new regiments. One of those raised that year was recruited in Aberdeenshire in north-east Scotland by Alexander Gordon, 4th Duke of Gordon, a major Scottish nobleman. On his recruiting tours Gordon was accompanied by his wife Jane dressed in military uniform. Regimental legend states that she offered a kiss to every recruit while holding their ‘King’s shilling’ (initial pay) between her lips.

The regiment's initial postings were garrison ones to Gibraltar and Corsica. Four years after its formation it rose from 100th to 92nd in the order of precedence and in 1799 it saw its first action in the Netherlands. In 1800 it was sent to support an attempted French Royalist landing at Quiberon Bay on the north-west coast of France. The following year it fought in Egypt under Sir Ralph Abercromby, winning the battle honour ‘Mandora’ and the sphinx in its cap badge. It then remained in Britain and Ireland for five years from 1802.

The regiment formed part of the force sent to attack Copenhagen in 1807 and anchored off Goteborg the following year to offer the Swedish king assistance. This was refused and the force re-routed to the Peninsula. The regiment fought at Corunna and wore a black line in its lace in memory of Sir John Moore’s death. Just six months after being evacuated from Corunna, the regiment was sent on the Walcheren Expedition, before returning to the Peninsula in 1810, fighting its way up into France by April 1814. It was in Ireland when Napoleon escaped from Elba and was rushed to the continent soon enough to fight at Quatre Bras and Waterloo in 1815.

The regiment spent much of the post-war period in Scotland and Ireland, though it was sent to Jamaica for eight years in 1819 and Barbados for three years in 1841. Other overseas postings included Gibraltar, Malta and Corfu. During the Crimean War (1854-56) the regiment was stationed in Turkey, gaining no battle honours for the campaign. In 1858 the regiment sailed for India during the Mutiny (1857-59), returning to Britain in 1863. In 1868 it returned to India, this time for 13 years, in which it fought in the Second Afghan War (1878-80). In January 1881 the regiment moved to South Africa and in July the same year it merged with the 75th Regiment of Foot to form The Gordon Highlanders. 



|Communications|



Steam: Cpt. Gordon MacKenzie


Teamspeak: Given out after contact.

If you would like to organise an event with the 92nd or talk to one of its members or officers then please add the Steam link above. Also if you are a member of the regiment you are expected to have FinnyBoySPA on Steam.



|Media|



Signatures



[close]
Gallery

Sunday Siege Event


[close]
Banner re-skin



Made by. Jack

[close]



Thanks to Herishey for the Template!
Thanks to NiPhix for the Header!



7
Regiments / Moved on to another mod!
« on: October 25, 2016, 10:34:38 pm »
Moved on to another mod.

8
Confederates / 14th Virginia Regiment of Foot | EU - NA
« on: September 27, 2016, 11:49:13 pm »








The 14th is a European-based Regiment on North and South, we do accept North Americans also.
Our members range to very experienced with a few years spent on the game to new players that are striving to improve, with all members striving to improve the 14th as well as their personal playing skills.

Banner

DA_14thVA_Rank_Name

Ranks
   

Commissioned Officers

Captain
1st Lieutenant
2nd Lieutenant
Adjutant

Non-Commissioned Officers

Sergeant Major
Staff Sergeant
Sergeant
Corporal

Enlisted

Lance Corporal
Private First Class
Veteran Private
Private
Recruit

[close]



Steam: FinnyBoySPA

TeamSpeak: Given out after contact.

If you would like to organise an event with the 14th or talk to one of its members or officers then please add the Steam link above. Also if you are a member of the regiment you are expected to have FinnyBoySPA on Steam.

Monday - Free Day   
Tuesday - Free Day
Wednesday - Free Day
Thursday - Regimental Training at 5:00 pm GMT / BST
Friday - Casual Event at 9:00pm GMT / BST
Saturday - 1st Div vs UB Event at 9:00 pm GMT / BST
Sunday - Siege Event at 9:00 pm GMT / BST



Quote
In-Game Name:
Previous Regimental Experience:
Steam Name:
Nationality:
Age*:


Signatures



[close]
Gallery

WIP

[close]
Banner re-skin


Made by. Jack

[close]





Thread made by Rival



9




About the 28th 'North Gloucestershire' Regiment of Foot

The 28th is a European-based Regiment on Napoleonic Wars.
Our members range to very experienced with a few years spent on the game to new players that are striving to improve, with all members striving to improve the 28th as well as their personal playing skills.
There are trainings once at the start of every week. Though optional, these trainings are here to provide practice, improvement in skill, helpful sessions about tactics and general gameplay, also to those who make every effort for it, progression towards promotions.
The Regiment also provides leadership openings to those who have served with activity, loyalty, and reliability, but are only approved to those who seek leading, providing a relaxed experience for the players who simply wish to play and have fun with their community.


Regimental History
For their conduct at the Battle of Alexandria in 1801 the 28th was given the unique honour of wearing a badge on both the front and rear of their head dress. This commemorated a possibly unique feat, when, drawn up in two ranks to repel a French infantry attack, they repelled a simultaneous attack on their rear by French cavalry. Lieutenant-Colonel Chambers, who had taken over command following the serious wounding of the Commanding Officer, Colonel Paget, gave the historic order "Rear rank, 28th! Right about face!". The rear ranks turned and with exemplary discipline waited until the French cavalry were a few horse lengths away. They then fired one devastating volley, causing heavy casualties amongst the cavalry and forcing them to withdraw. The regiment served throughout the Peninsula War, including the battles of Talavera, Albuhera and Vittoria. They were one of the few Peninsula veteran regiments which were available for the Hundred Days campaign and fought in the battles of Quatre Bras and Waterloo as part of the 8th Brigade commanded by James Kempt. Because of their actions in this campaign, they earned distinguished mention in the dispatches of the Duke of Wellington. During the Hundred Days the 28th continued to wear the old style stovepipe shako, distinguishing them from most British regiments that had adopted the new Belgic shako.

After several changes of the regiment, another important change took place in this year when the government of the day decided to link regiments to districts or counties for the purpose of recruitment. So it was that when the 28th came home in the following year of 1783 it was to be known by the new title of the 28th North Gloucestershire Regiment of Foot. The county they were now linked to was also home to the 61st South Gloucestershire Regiment of Foot and the Royal North, and South Gloucestershire Militia's. Almost crowded from a military point of view! And unlikely that all those units could have found enough recruits within the county to satisfy all their needs. In any case the 28th had little chance to become acquainted with their new territory because they were immediately packed off to Northumberland for the winter. It may well be that they heartily wished themselves back in the warmer West Indies with all it's attendant perils of disease.

The French revolution began in 1789 and from then on set the whole of Europe alight with conflict. Under the genius of Napoleon Bonaparte the French had won battles against nearly every major nation and now dominated the European mainland. She now turned her attention outward towards Great Britain and Her overseas possessions. France had sent an expeditionary force to Egypt with a view to the invasion of India. The 28th were sent as part of a British force under General Sir Ralph Abercromby to counter that threat. They made an amphibious landing near Alexandria on the 8th of March. The French General Menou advanced towards the British who were camped about four miles to the east of Alexandria. He had the advantage of 1400 cavalry and superior artillery. He made a feint towards the British left but made his main thrust at the British right which included the ground the 28th were holding which was an old ruined fort on the Mediterranean coast. The fighting was very fierce and whilst under heavy attack to the front and flanks French cavalry was thrown at the 28th's rear. Lieutenant Colonel Chambers who had assumed command when colonel Paget was seriously wounded was undaunted by this alarming turn of events and gave the order ' 28th, rear rank only, right about face, and Although assailed from both sides the regiment calmly repelled all attacks in fierce hand to hand fighting. By 10.00 am the French were in full retreat along their entire line. In honour of the 28th's conduct on that day they were granted the unique distinction of wearing a badge on the back of their head dress as well as at the front. This badge takes the form of a sphinx with the word 'Egypt' beneath.

Quatre Bras
An expedition under sir John Moore including the 28th was sent to Spain to link up with the Spanish army and drive the French out of the country. However General Moore soon realised that the Spanish army was not going to stand against the French. He also learned that the French were moving to isolate and destroy his force leaving him with no choice but to withdraw the 240 miles to the port of Corunna. The 28th formed part of the rear guard under their own General Paget, now recovered from his wound and Divisional Commander under General Moore. Throughout this gruelling retreat the 28th had been in almost constant contact with the French and had fought many holding and delaying actions. The army reached Corunna on the 11th January and were able to regroup, get some much needed sleep and food, and be issued with arms and ammunition. They then fought the French again just outside of Corunna and succeeded in beating them before being successfully taken off by the Royal Navy. A precursor of Dunkirk? Although the main part of the regiment left the Peninsula it left a detachment behind in Lisbon which as part of a composite battalion under the Duke of Wellington took part in the battle of Talavera. Many more famous battles were fought before the final push in 1813 which saw the defeat of the French at the battle of Toulouse in 1814 and the abdication and exile of Napoleon to the island of Elba.

In March of this year Napoleon escaped from Elba and returned to France gathering popular support as he travelled slowly from the coast to Paris. An allied army was assembled in Belgium which included the 28th who had hurried across the sea from Ireland where they had been stationed for several years. Napoleon was aware that he had only a short time to obtain a quick victory whilst the allies were still bickering about who should do what and before the allied army grew to an overwhelming size. He therefore marched towards Brussels on the 15th June. He met the Prussian army at Ligny driving them off and nearly destroying them completely. Wellington had decided to stop the French advance at Quatre Bras some 25 miles south of Brussels and on 16th June at the crossroads the battle was joined. The 28th in square against cavalry valiantly resisted every effort to break them and eventually Marshall Ney, the French Commander was forced to withdraw. During the height of the battle Sir James Kempt, the Brigade Commander rode into the 28th's square, doffed his hat and cried 'Bravo 28th, The 28th are still the 28th and your conduct this day shall never be forgotten'.



Rank Structure
     

Commissioned Officers
Colonel   Col
Lt. Colonel   LtCol
Major   Maj
Captain   Capt
Lieutenant   Lt
Ensign   Ens
Non-Commissioned Officers
Serjeant Major   SjtMaj
Colour Serjeant   CSjt
Serjeant   Sjt
Corporal   Cpl
Enlisted Men
Lance Corporal   LCpl
Grenadier   Gren
Regular   Rgl
Private   Pte
Recruit   Rec


Thread was made by Blaze!
Some pictures used are from old 28th Thread!



Pages: 1